Your Free Guide to Food Stamps

You will learn about:

Your Free Guide to Food Stamps

You will learn about:
  • Eligibility requirements to get Food Stamps benefits
  • Application methods by state
  • Contact information for state and local agencies

250 min – Estimated reading time

OPG Guides

Your Free Guide to Food Stamps

Your Free Guide to Food Stamps

What is SNAP?

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), also known as Food Stamps, is a federal program that provides nutrition benefits to millions of low-income individuals and families. The nutrition benefits are issued to beneficiaries once per month on an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card that can be used like a debit card at participating groceries to buy approved food items.

SNAP has assisted citizens and permanent residents of the United States for more than 75 years under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). The program provides nutrition assistance, job assistance and education services that teach individuals and families how to eat healthy.

How Does SNAP Work?

SNAP is regulated on a state level, run by different departments in each state’s government. For a household to get SNAP benefits, a representative from that household needs to undergo an extensive application process, which includes submitting in- depth information about both the personal and financial histories of the applicant and his or her household.

The first step in the SNAP application process is determining if your household qualifies to receive government food stamp benefits. You can learn about your potential qualifications by using a pre-screening tool online, if your state offers one. Otherwise, you can simply apply for benefits.

In some states, SNAP applications are looped in with additional government benefits programs (like Medicaid), so that all of your household data can be analyzed and assessed simultaneously. However, state benefit programs are still handled as different entities and your food stamps eligibility will remain separate from additional support benefits your household may be eligible to get.

If you apply and your household is approved by your state’s department, you will get a monthly food stamp allotment. The amount of SNAP benefits you get is based on three major household factors: income, expenses and size.

These funds are not considered taxable income by the Internal Revenue Service.

The only way to purchase food with Food Stamps is with an electronic debit card, referred to as an Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) card. Paper coupons are no longer valid or issued. Your EBT card will be loaded with funds, which you use to purchase food at groceries and retailers that accept EBT payments.

Beneficiaries can shop for food in grocery stores, convenience stores, farmers’ markets and co-ops. These retailers will commonly place an “EBT” logo on display letting you know that SNAP benefits can be utilized.

Although SNAP is regulated at the state level, your EBT card will be valid for use in other states at qualified grocers. For example, you can use your Florida EBT card in a New York supermarket.

The name of the Food Stamps program and the benefits card you receive, along with the process to collect benefits, vary depending on the state you live in. Please refer to “Contact Information by Location” for information on your local program’s name and how to get in touch with local offices.

Eligible Foods Covered by SNAP

Most food items intended for human consumption are eligible for purchase with SNAP benefits. In addition, items that may not be labelled as food, such as water, or bags of ice, are eligible foods.

Staple foods are the basic foods that make up a significant portion of a person’s diet and are usually prepared at home and eaten as a meal. Staple foods can be purchased with SNAP benefits.

Staple foods are divided into four main categories:

  1. Fruits and Vegetables
    Staple foods that are fruits and vegetables also include other fruit and vegetable varieties. In the vegetables or fruits staple food category, “variety” is generally defined by product kind or main ingredient. For example, you can buy applesauce or apple juice because they are considered apples.
    For multiple-ingredient food products, the first ingredient determines variety. For example, a can of ravioli with tomato sauce listed as the first ingredient would constitute a variety in the vegetables or fruits staple food category (i.e., tomato).
    *You can buy any fruit or vegetable staple food variety fresh, canned, frozen, or dried.
  2. Meat, Poultry and Fish
    In the meat, poultry, or fish staple food category, “variety” is generally defined by product kind or main ingredient. This means that chicken, pork, and beef each represent a variety. However, beefsteak and ground beef are not each considered specific varieties, as they are both considered beef.
    For multiple-ingredient food products, the first ingredient determines variety. For example, a can of beef stew with beef listed as the first ingredient would constitute a variety in the meat, poultry, or fish staple food category (i.e., beef).
    *You generally cannot purchase live animals with your SNAP benefits. However, there are a few exceptions as long as they are planned for consumption. Learn more about these exceptions on the “Non-Eligible Items Not Covered by SNAP section of this guide.
  3. Dairy Products
    In the dairy products staple food category, “variety” is defined by product kind or main ingredient. This means that yogurt, cheese, and milk each represent varieties. This also means that Swiss cheese and cheddar cheese are not each considered specific varieties, as they are both considered cheese. Plant-based dairy products are also considered a variety in the dairy products staple food category.
    For multiple-ingredient food products, the first ingredient determines the variety. For example, a jar of Alfredo sauce with milk listed as the first ingredient would constitute a variety in the dairy products staple food category (i.e., milk).
    Plant-based dairy products, butter substitutes, and infant formula are an exception to this, because they are considered staple food varieties in the dairy products category even though the first listed ingredient of those products is not always dairy-based.
    *You can buy any dairy or plant-based dairy staple food variety fresh, powdered, canned, and dried.
  4. Breads, Cereals, Pastas and Rice
    In the bread or cereals staple food category, “variety” is defined by product kind or main ingredient. This means that buns/rolls, bread, and pitas each represent specific varieties. This also means that hotdog buns and hamburger buns are not each considered specific varieties, as they are both considered buns/rolls.
    For multiple-ingredient food products, the first ingredient determines variety. For example, a frozen chicken pot pie with wheat flour listed as the first ingredient would constitute a variety in the bread or cereals staple food category (i.e., wheat).
    *You can buy any bread, cereal, pasta, or rice staple food variety that is fresh, frozen, dried, or packaged.

Accessory Foods are considered to be food items consumed as snacks or desserts, as well as food items that complement or supplement meals, such as most beverages and spices. In addition to Staple Foods, Accessory Foods are also eligible to purchase with SNAP benefits.

*Package size has no bearing on whether a food is an accessory food. Therefore, staple foods packaged in single- serving or snack-sized packages are still considered staple foods.

*Any food product explicitly identified as a staple food, such as a fresh apple or banana, is not considered an accessory food even if it is sometimes consumed as a snack.

See below examples of snacks, desserts, and meal supplements.

Examples of Snacks

  • Wheat, potato, tortilla, pita, vegetable and corn chips, crisps, straws and sticks
  • Onion ring snacks
  • Snack mixes
  • Corn nuts
  • Popcorn
  • Cheese curls or puffs
  • Pretzels
  • Crackers
  • Pork rinds

Examples of Dessert

  • Brownies
  • Cupcakes
  • Pastries
  • Churros
  • Scones
  • Gelatin desserts
  • Doughnuts
  • Snack cakes
  • Muffins
  • Pies
  • Cakes
  • Sweet rolls
  • Chocolate
  • Pudding
  • Marshmallows
  • Gum
  • Toffee
  • Nougat
  • Candy
  • Fudge
  • Brittle
  • Marzipan
  • Ice milk
  • Custard
  • Sorbet
  • Gelato
  • Italian ices
  • Ice cream
  • Whipped cream
  • Sherbet
  • Frozen carbonated beverage
  • Granita
  • Ice pops
  • Snow cones
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Mints

Meal Supplement Examples

  • Spices and seasonings
  • Baking powder and baking soda
  • Natural or artificial sweeteners
  • Carbonated and non carbonated drinks
  • Food additives
  • Edible non-caloric or non-digestible food products
  • Solid or liquid oils and fats
  • Condiments
  • Flavor extracts
  • Cooking wine
  • Gravy and bouillon
  • Other foods with these ingredients

Gift baskets, seasonal items, and special occasion items such as wedding cakes, Christmas stockings, and Easter baskets can have both food and non-food items. They are only eligible to purchase with SNAP benefits if the value of the food items clearly amounts to more than 50 percent of the purchase price.

*Gift packages with items containing non-cooking alcohol, tobacco, or pet food and/or pet toys are not eligible for purchase with SNAP benefits.

Non-food items you can purchase with SNAP benefits are:

  • Seeds and plants: Seeds or plants that are edible or used to produce edible roots, bushes, bulbs or spices can be purchased with SNAP benefits.
  • Hunting and Fishing Equipment: In Alaska, households that depend significantly on hunting and fishing for food, and that are determined to have limited access to food retail stores, can buy fishing nets, hooks, lines, harpoons, rods, and knives with SNAP benefits. They will be issued an ID card to use for these purchases. Other equipment will not be covered.
  • Military Commissary Surcharges: Any such surcharges at a military commissary grocery can be paid for with SNAP benefits so that recipients receive goods and services at cost.
  • Container Deposits: Any monetary deposits mandated by state law for foods or beverages sold in containers can be paid for with SNAP benefits. Retailer or manufacturer-based container deposits will not be covered.
  • Sales Tax: If the sales tax is included in the price of a SNAP-eligible item and is not shown or charged separately, it can be paid for with SNAP benefits.

Non-Eligible Items Not Covered by SNAP

Prepared foods refer to hot or cold foods that are purchased in a store or restaurant that are not intended for home preparation and/or home consumption. They are presumed to be for immediate consumption, so they are non-eligible and are not covered by SNAP.

  • Hot prepared foods include any food product that is hot at the point of sale. For example:
    • Hot coffee or tea
    • Hot soup
    • Hot pizza
  • Cold prepared foods include any food made or prepared by the retailer/restaurant that requires no additional preparation. For example:
    • Fresh salads or salad bars
    • Sandwiches
    • Fruit cups
    • Meat and/or cheese platters
    • Meat sold without sealed packaging (distinct from uncooked meat)
    • Soft serve or scooped ice cream (distinct from a sealed container of ice cream)

Heated foods refer to foods that are cooked or heated by the retailer or restaurant before or after purchase. Prepared foods and heated foods are not eligible and are not covered by SNAP. 

Live animals are generally ineligible for purchase with SNAP benefits because they may be used as livestock or pets. SNAP benefits may not be used to pay any costs or fees for slaughtering live animals, or any separate charge for processing meat, poultry, or seafood.

The SNAP eligible exceptions to purchase live animals are:

  • Shellfish (lobster, crabs, clams, etc.)
  • Fish may be purchased live at the point-of-sale, as long as the fish are removed from water prior to removal from the premises of the seller
  • Other animals (including birds) that are live at the point-of-sale may be purchased with SNAP benefits if they are slaughtered prior to removal from the premises of the seller

Other non-eligible items you cannot purchase with SNAP benefits are:

  • Alcohol and food products containing alcohol, with the exception of cooking ingredients and extracts that contain alcohol
  • Paper products
  • Tobacco and nicotine delivery products
  • Medicine
  • Dietary supplements
  • Soaps and toiletry items
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Pet food
  • Firearms, munitions and explosives
  • Gardening supplies
  • Cooking utensils
  • Equipment for food preservation
  • Gasoline
  • Clothing
  • Hardware
  • Items not intended for human consumption
  • Fees established by private retailers or stores, such as: food delivery fees or grocery bag fees

Contact Information by Location

LocationProgram Name in LocationContact InformationOffice Directory
AlabamaFood AssistanceToll-free number: 1-833- 822-220
TTY: 1-833-822-2202 / 711 or 1-800-548-2546
https://dhr.alabama.gov/county-office-contact/
AlaskaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 907-465-3347http://dhss.alaska.gov/dpa/Pages/contacts.aspx
American SamoaAmerican Samoa Nutrition Assistance Program (ASNAP)Hotlines: 684-633-7720 684-633-7451Not available.
ArizonaNutrition AssistanceHotline: 1-800-352-8401 General information: 1-855-
432-7587 TTY: 711
https://des.az.gov/services/ basic-needs/family- assistance/contact-family- assistance-administration-f
ArkansasSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotlines: 1-800-482-8988 / 501-682-8269
TTY/TDD: 501-682-7958
https://humanservices. arkansas.gov/offices
CaliforniaCalFreshHotline: 1-877-847-3663 TYY: 711https://cdss.ca.gov/county-offices
ColoradoSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-800-536-5298 TTY: 800https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdhs/contact-your-county
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana IslandsCNMI Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP)Hotlines: 237-2801/237- 2802
Email: support@cnminap.
gov.mp
http://www.dcca.gov.mp/contact/
ConnecticutSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-860-424-5030
TTY: 800-842-4524
https://portal.ct.gov/dss/ About-the-Department-of- Social-Services/Contact
DelawareFood Supplement Program
Hotline: 1-800-372-2022
TTY: 711
https://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dss/
contact.html
District of ColumbiaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 202-673-4464 TTY: 711https://dcgis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/SimpleViewer/ index.html?appid=ff- c9e2992d9f429489b- 84110284f81a8
FloridaFood Assistance Program (FAP)Hotlines:
1-866-762-2237/
850-300-4323
TTY: 711/ 1-800-955-8771
https://www.myflfamilies. com/service-programs/ access/map.shtml
GeorgiaGeorgia Food Stamp ProgramHotline: 1-877-423-4746
TTY: 1-800-255-0135
https://dfcs.georgia.gov/ locations
GuamSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 671-735-7245http://www.dphss.guam.gov/content/contact-us
HawaiiSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 855-643-1643
TTY: 711
http://humanservices. hawaii.gov/wp-content/ uploads/2013/01/ Addresses-for-Benefits- Offices-Statewide.pdf
IdahoIdaho Food StampsHotline: 1-877-456-1233
TTY: 211/ 1-800-926-2588
https://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/ContactUs/tabid/127/Default.aspx
IllinoisSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 1-800-843-6154
TTY: 711/ 1-800-447-6404
http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?module=12
IndianaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-877-768-5098
DFR toll-free phone: 1-800- 403-0864
TTY: 711
https://secure.in.gov/apps/fssa/providersearch/map
IowaFood Assistance Program (FAP)
Hotline: 1-877-347-5678 / 1-888-426-6283
TTY: 1-800-735-2942
https://dhs.iowa.gov/dhs_office_locator
KansasFood Assistance Program (FAP)Hotline: 1-785-296-1491http://www.dcf.ks.gov/ services/Pages/DCFOfficeLocatorMap.aspx
KentuckySupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 800-372-2973
TTY: 1-785-296-1491
Not available
LouisianaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-888-524-3578
TTY: 1-844-224-6188
http://www.dss.state.la.us/directory
MaineFood Supplement Program (FSP) Hotline: 877-463-6207
TTY: 711
https://www.maine.gov/dhhs/about/contact/offices
MarylandFood Supplement Program (FSP)Hotline: 1-800-332-6347
TTY: 1-800-735-2258
http://dhr.maryland.gov/local-offices/
MassachusettsSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 1-800-249-2007
TTY: 711 / 1-800-720-3480 / 1-866-930-9252 (SPA)
https://www.mass.gov/orgs/department-of-transitional-assistance/locations?_page=1
MichiganFood Assistance Program (FAP)Hotline: 1-855-275-6424
TTY: 711
https://mdhhs.michigan.gov/CompositeDirPub/CountyCompositeDirectory. aspx
MinnesotaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 800-657-3698 (toll- free)
TTY: 1-800-627-3529
https://mn.gov/dhs/general-public/about-dhs/contact-us/counties-and-regional-offices/
MississippiFood Assistance Program (FAP)Hotline: 1-800-948-3050
General assistance: 601- 359-4500
TTY: 711 / 1-800-735-2466
https://www.mdhs.ms.gov/contact/
MissouriFood Stamp Program (FSP)Hotline: 1-800-392-1261
TTY: 1-800-735-2966
https://dss.mo.gov/dss_map/
MontanaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 1-800-332-2272 / 888-706-1535
TYY: 406-444-1421
https://dphhs.mt.gov/hcsd/OfficeofPublicAssistance.aspx
NebraskaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-800-383-4278
TTY: 711 / 1-800-833-7352
http://dhhs.ne.gov/DD%20Documents/DHHS-DD%20Main%20Directory.pdf#search=locations
NevadaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotlines: 1-800-992-0900 / 775-684-0615 (ext. 40500)
TTY: 1-800-326-6888 /
1-800-992-0900 (voice)
https://dwss.nv.gov/Contact/Welfare/
New HampshireSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 1-800-852-3345 (ext. 9700)
TTY: 1-800-735-2964 / 711
https://www.dhhs.nh.gov/contactus/districtoffices.htm
New JerseySupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotlines: 1-800-792-9773 / 1-800-687-9512
TTY: 1-800-701-0720
https://www.nj.gov/humanservices/dfd/programs/njsnap/cbss/index.html
New MexicoSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 800-432-6217
TTY: 1-877-294-4356 / 711
https://www.hsd.state.nm.us/LookingForAssistance/Field_Offices_1.aspx
New YorkSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotlines: 1-800-342-3009/ 718-557-1399 (NYC only) TTY: 711 / 212-504-4115 (NYC only)http://otda.ny.gov/workingfamilies/dss.asp
North CarolinaFood and Nutrition Ser- vices Hotline: 1-800-662-7030
TTY: 711
https://www.ncdhhs.gov/divisions/social-services/local-dss-directory
North DakotaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-800-755-2716
TTY: 1-800-366-6888
http://www.nd.gov/dhs/locations/countysocialserv/
OhioFood Assistance Program (FAP)Hotline: 1-866-244-0071
TTY: 711
http://jfs.ohio.gov/county/county_directory.pdf
OklahomaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-866-411-1877
TTY: 711
http://www.okdhs.org/countyoffices/Pages/default.aspx
OregonSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotlines: 1-800-723-3638 / 503-945-5600
TTY: 503-945-5896
https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/Self-Sufficiency.aspx
PennsylvaniaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotlines: 1-800-692-7462 / 1-800-451-5886
TTY: 1-800-451-5886
https://www.dhs.pa.gov/Services/Assistance/Pages/Find%20Facilities.aspx
Puerto RicoPrograma de Asistencia Nutricional (PAN)Hotlines: 311 / 787- 289-http://servicios.adsef.pr.gov/contactenos.aspx
Rhode IslandSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotlines: 401-462-5300 / 401-785-3340
TTY: 711 / 1-800-745-6575 (Voice) / 1-800-745-5555
http://www.dhs.ri.gov/DHSOffices/DHS-14FieldOfficeListingRev%20 01-20.pdf
South CarolinaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-800-616-1309
TTY: 711 / 1-800-735-8583
https://dss.sc.gov/contact/
South DakotaSupplemental Nutrition As- sistance Program (SNAP)
Hotlines: 1-877-999-5612 / 1-866-854-5465
TTY: 711
https://dss.sd.gov/findyourlocaloffice/
TennesseeSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-866-311-4287
TTY: 711
https://www.tn.gov/content/tn/humanservices/for-families/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap/office-locator-family-assistance.html
TexasSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotlines: 211 (toll-free) / 1-877-541-7905
TTY: 711
https://www.dshs.texas.gov/regions/default.shtm
U.S. Virgin IslandsSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 340-774-2399http://www.dhs.gov.vi/contact/index.html
UtahSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotlines: 1-866-526-3663 / 1-800-331-4341
TTY: 711 / 1-800-346-4128
https://jobs.utah.gov/jsp/officesearch/#/map
Vermont3SquaresVTHotline: 1-800-479-6151
TTY: 711 / 1-800-253-0191
https://dcf.vermont.gov/main-contacts
VirginiaSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 1-800-552-3431
TTY: 1-800-828-1120 / 711
https://www.dss.virginia.gov/localagency/index.cgi
WashingtonBasic FoodHotline: 1-877-501-2233 TTY: 711https://www.dshs.wa.gov/office-locations?field_geo-field_distance%5B-distance%5D=100&-field_geofield_distance%5Bunit%5D=3959&-field_geofield_distance%5B-origin%5D=&field_office_type_tid%5B0%5D=9651
West Virginia Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)Hotline: 1-800-642-8589
TTY: 866-430-1274 (TTY)
or 800-676-3777 (Voice) / 1-800-676-4290 (SPA)
https://dhhr.wv.gov/bcf/Pages/MapList.aspx
WisconsinFood ShareHotline: 1-800-362-3002
TTY: 711 / 1-800-947-3529
https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/forwardhealth/imagen-cy/index.htm
WyomingSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP)
Hotline: 307-777-5846
TTY: 711 / 1-800-452-1408
(TTY/Voice)
https://dfs.wyo.gov/about/contact-us/

Note: Applicants from federally recognized Native American Tribal Nations should contact the administrative department in the state where their tribal nation is located.

For more information on SNAP for Native Americans and other food assistance available, please refer to the SNAP for Native Americans section.

Eligibility Requirements for SNAP

Eligibility requirements were put in place as a way to regulate both the amount of people accepted into SNAP each year as well as the amount of benefits a household can receive. Even though SNAP is regulated at a state level, eligibility requirements are reviewed on a national scale.

The main factors in determining your eligibility for SNAP benefits are:

  • income,
  • work requirements,
  • resource restrictions, and
  • state residency

You must apply in the state where you currently live to get SNAP benefits.

State Residency and Citizenship

To receive SNAP benefits, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or have an eligible residency status
  • Be a resident of the state where you plan to claim benefits

SNAP benefits do not transfer from one state to another if you choose to relocate. Instead, you must close your SNAP account in one state, and then re- apply for SNAP in your new state of residence.

If you are not a U.S. citizen and would like to apply for SNAP, you must prove lawful presence in the country, along with meeting the other eligibility requirements related to both income and resources.

If you are a noncitizen who meets the work, income, state residency and resource requirements for SNAP, you can still receive benefits if you are a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR) who either has earned 40 quarters of work or can be credited with them.

Non-citizen adults need to wait up to five years before collecting SNAP benefits if they are in any of the following situations:

  • They have been paroled for at least one year by the Attorney General for urgent humanitarian reasons or for the benefit of the public
  • They have been granted conditional entry into the U.S. from a Middle Eastern country and cannot return due to their race, religion or political opinion
  • They have a pending family-sponsor petition with the Attorney General

However, if you fall into one of the following groups, you can collect SNAP benefits without having been a legal permanent resident for five years:

  • Lawful permanent residents who meet certain work history requirements
  • Children younger than 18
  • Refugees who have been admitted under Section 207 of INA
  • Asylees under Section 208 of the INA
  • Individuals receiving blindness or disability benefits
  • Individuals whose deportations are being withheld under 243(h) or 241(b)(3) of INA
  • Amerasian individuals under 584 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs Appropriations Act
  • EntrantsthatareCubanorHaitianasdefinedin 501(e) of the Refugee Education Assistance Act of 1980
  • Veterans who were honorably discharged for reasons other than alien status, as well as their spouses and unmarried dependent children
  • Individuals on active duty in the Armed Forces, as well as their spouses and unmarried dependent children
  • Elderly individuals born on or before August 22, 1931 who were lawfully residing in the U.S. on August 22, 1996

Income Requirements

Income requirements are determined by SNAP. You and your household have to meet gross and net income limits to be eligible for SNAP and receive benefits. You do not need to factor in if you are receiving additional government assistance benefits when you calculate your monthly income.

If your household earns a combined income that totals more than the defined poverty line, you will not receive SNAP benefits.

In most cases, you need to meet a monthly gross income requirement and an annual net income requirement.

  • Gross income is the total amount of non-excluded income you earn before any deductions have been subtracted, while
  • Net income is the total amount you earn minus taxes and any deductions.

Exceptions to this requirement are Puerto Rico and the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, which consider only annual net income and monthly gross income, respectively. Households with elderly or disabled members also have different income requirements. They must only meet the net income requirement, as opposed to both the net and gross income requirements. Both are explained below.

What is the federal poverty level (FPL)?

The federal poverty level (FPL), federal poverty guideline or the poverty line is an economic measure that represents annual income and is used by the U.S. government to determine eligibility for SNAP.

The FPL is a set minimum amount of income a family needs to afford food, housing, clothing and other basic necessities. Every year, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services updates the guidelines by considering the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). These values are then rounded and adjusted to the size of the household.

The FPL is not the same as the poverty threshold. The poverty threshold is another measure created by the U.S. Census Bureau and defines what poverty is and the number of Americans that live in poverty. The FPL is based on the statistical report of the poverty threshold.

The table below shows figures that are valid through September 2020. The annual net income requirement is based on 100 percent of the federal poverty line.

2021 Annual Federal Poverty Levels
Household Size
48 contiguous states + DC
AlaskaHawaii
1$12,880$16,090$14,820
2$17,420$21,770$20,040
3$21,960$27,450$25,260
4$26,500$33,130$30,480
5$31,040$38,810$35,700
6$35,580$44,490$40,920
7$40,120$50,170$46,140
8$44,660$55,850$51,360
Each additional member$4,540$5,680$5,220

To calculate 100 percent of the FPL, divide your household net annual income by the FPL and multiply it by 100.

Example: if a household of three earns $80,000 as annual net income, first divide 80,000 by the FPL for a family of three, 21,720. The result is 3.68.
Next, multiply 3.68 by 100, which equals 368%.
This is above the 100% FPL threshold, so the example family will not qualify for SNAP benefits.

Income Eligibility for the 48 Contiguous U.S. States, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands

The table below shows figures that are valid through September 2021. The gross monthly income requirement is based on 130 percent of the federal poverty line. To calculate 130 percent of the FPL, divide your household gross monthly income by the FPL for your household size and multiply it by 130.

Monthly Income Eligibility Standards (48 U.S. states, Guam and U.S. Virgin Islands)
Household SizeGross Monthly IncomeNet Monthly Income
1$1,383$1,064
2$1,868$1,437
3$2,353$1,810
4$2,839$2,184
5$3,324$2,557
6$3,809$2,930
7$4,295$3,304
8$4,780$3,677
Each additional member+$486+$374

Income Eligibility for Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands

Alaska Monthly Income Requirements (Effective 10/1/2020)
Household SizeGross Monthly IncomeNet Monthly Income
1$1,728$1,330
2$2,335$1,796
3$2,942$2,263
4$3,538$2,730
5$4,115$3,196
6$4,762$3,663
7$5,368$4,130
8$5,975$4,596
Each additional member$6074,130$
Hawaii Monthly Income Requirements (Effective 10/1/2020)
Household SizeGross Monthly IncomeNet Monthly Income
1$1,591$1,224
2$2,149$1,653
3$2,707$2,082
4$3,265$2,511
5$3,822$2,940
6$4,380$3,370
7$4,938$3,799
8$5,496$4,228
Each additional member$558$430
Puerto Rico Annual Income Requirements
Household SizeNet Annual Income
1$3,063
2$4,138
3$5,213
4$6,288
5$7,364
6$8,439
7$9,514
8$10,589
Each additional member+$1,075
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (Effective 10/1/2020)
Household Size
Gross Monthly Income
1$781
2$1,058
3$1,334
4$1,610
5$1,886
6$2,162
7$2,438
8$2,715
Each additional member+$276

Income Eligibility for Native Americans

Applicants from federally recognized Native American Tribal Nations will need to meet the requirements established in the state where their tribe is located. For more information, please refer to the SNAP for Native Americans section of the guide.

Resource Restrictions

There are two different types of resources that can be taken into account:

  • Liquid resources: These can be readily turned into cash (bonds, stocks, money in savings accounts and credit unions, and uncashed checks, among others).
  • Non-liquid resources: These cannot be turned quickly into cash. A few examples of non-liquid resources are houses, vehicles and livestock.

Some resources are not counted for this program:

  • Your home and lot
  • The resources of household members receiving SSI or TANF
  • The balance of most retirement or pension plans

Resource Restrictions for the 50 U.S. States, Guam, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands

If you apply for SNAP in any of the 50 U.S. states, Guam, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands, you are only permitted to have a total of $2,250 in countable resources or assets or $3,500 in countable resources if there is a household member who is age 60 or older or disabled living with you. These values are valid through September 2020.

Resource Restrictions for Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands

Puerto Rico and the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands are the only exceptions, where residents applying for food stamps can only have a total of $2,000 in countable resources or $3,000 for households with elderly or fully disabled members.

Resource Restrictions on Vehicles

States have the right to determine whether to exempt or consider the equity value of the vehicle among a household’s countable resources. There is a federal SNAP vehicle resource test available for states that wish to follow it.

This test has 3 steps:

  1. Determine which vehicles are exempted in your state. Unless expressly indicated by your state, vehicles are considered exempt when:
    • They are used to produce income (taxi cabs, for example)
    • They produce annual income consistent with their fair market value
    • They are used for long-distance travel for work (for salespeople, for example)
    • They are used to transport physically disabled household members
    • They are used as the home of the household
    • They are used to carry fuel for heat or water for the household
    • Their value provides a return of $1,500 or less
  2. Evaluate the fair market value of any vehicle that is not exempted in step 1. The used car “Blue Book” is commonly used as a reference. If the amount is more than $4,650, the amount will be considered among the household’s resources. Each vehicle must be considered separately.
  3. The equity test is the final step. To estimate the worth of non-liquid resources, you need to determine the equity value. Calculate the equity value by subtracting any debt the household has on the property from its fair market value (i.e. the amount of money you can get by selling that property today). If the equity value is below $1,500, then the resource will be excluded.

To know whether your household’s vehicle(s) will be considered as a countable resource, review the following table:

State/District/TerritoryAre vehicles countable resources?Notes
AlabamaNO
AlaskaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
American SamoaInformation is not available.Please contact your local DHHS office. Refer to the Contact Information by Location section for contact information.
ArizonaNO
ArkansasYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
CaliforniaNO
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana IslandsInformation not available.Please contact your local Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) office. Refer to the Contact Information by Location section for more information.
ColoradoNO
ConnecticutNO
DelawareYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
District of ColumbiaNO
FloridaNO
GeorgiaNO
GuamInformation not available.Please contact your local Department of Human Services. Refer to the Contact Information by Location section for more
information.
HawaiiYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. Exemptions will also include vehicles that are not in use for a certain time because of unemployment or sickness.
IdahoNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes,
etc.) and these will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
IllinoisNO
IndianaNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes, etc.).
IowaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
KansasYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
KentuckyNO
LouisianaNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes,
etc.) and they will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
MaineNO
MarylandNO
MassachusettsNO
MichiganNO
MinnesotaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
MississippiNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes, etc.) and they will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
MissouriNO
MontanaNO
NebraskaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. However, in addition to the
exempted vehicles in the federal test, any licensed or unlicensed vehicle with a fair market value of $12,000 or less will be exempted. Only one vehicle per household will be exempted under this rule.
NevadaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
New HampshireYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. Unusable vehicles will also be
exempted (those which are used to supply parts or too broken to use or sell).
New JerseyNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes, etc.) and they will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
New MexicoNO
New YorkYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
North CarolinaNO
North DakotaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
OhioNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes, etc.) and they will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
OklahomaNOThe only vehicles that will be counted are recreational (RVs, campers, motorhomes,
etc.) and they will be considered according to the federal resource equity test.
OregonYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. However, in addition to the exempted vehicles in the federal test, licensed or unlicensed vehicles with a
fair market value of $10,000 or less will be exempted. Once the total FMV of all vehicles is added, then the $10,000 will be subtracted. The remaining amount will be counted as a resource.
PennsylvaniaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
Puerto RicoYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. However, in addition to the exempted vehicles in the federal test, licensed or unlicensed vehicles with a
fair market value of $6,000 or less will be exempted. Once the total fair market value of all vehicles is added, then the $6,000 will be subtracted. The remaining amount will be counted as a resource.
Rhode IslandYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
South CarolinaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
South DakotaYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
TennesseeNO
TexasYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test. However, in addition to the
exempted vehicles in the federal test, a fair market value of $15,000 or less will be exempted. Only the vehicle with the highest value will be exempted under this rule.
UtahNO
U.S. Virgin IslandsInformation not available.Please contact your local Department of Human Services. Refer to the Contact Information by Location section for more information.
VermontYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
VirginiaNO
WashingtonYESThe state follows the federal resource equity test.
West VirginiaNO
WisconsinNO
WyomingNO

Resource Exemptions for Vehicles

If your household has any vehicles that are used to attend an interview for work, go to work, go to job training or drive to school, those will not be subject to an equity test.

If you own a vehicle with both a fair market value that exceeds $4,650 and an equity value, the highest amount of the two will be counted as a countable resource.

If you have an unlicensed vehicle, the equity value will be counted regardless of the fair market value.

SNAP Income Deductions

Once your household income is added together, certain deductions will be subtracted from the total gross income amount. There is a standard deduction in each state, but the amount varies.

The standard deduction varies according to the size of the household:

Standard Deduction Amount (2020)
AreaHousehold Size (by no. of members)colspancolspancolspancolspan
1-23456+
48 states + DC$167$167$181$212$243
Alaska$286$286$286$286$304
Hawaii$236$236$236$244$280
Guam$336$336$363$425$487
U.S. Virgin Islands$147$150$181$212$243
*Information for American Samoa, the Mariana Islands (CNMI) and Puerto Rico was not available online. Please contact their main offices for more information.

In addition to a standard deduction, the following deductions are allowed for all households:

  • 20 percent of your earned income
  • The cost of dependent child care you need while working, looking for a job or getting training or education to do a job
  • Child support payments that you legally owe
  • Shelter expenses that cost more than half of your income (limits apply unless there is an elderly or disabled household member)
  • Medical expenses that exceed $35 per month for elderly or disabled household members

Below find the maximum amounts of shelter and homeless shelter deductions by region:

RegionMax. shelter deductionsMax. homeless shelter deductions
48 contiguous states + DC$586$156.74
Alaska$936$156.74
Hawaii$790$156.74
Guam$688$156.74
U.S. Virgin Islands$462$156.74

Deductions for American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands and Puerto Rico are not available. Please contact your local office to learn more (find contact information on the Contact Information by Location section of this guide).

Work Requirements

If you are between 18 and 59 years old, you need to meet work requirements to qualify for SNAP benefits. The requirement is that you must “register for work.” Registering for work means that you must meet one of the following requirements:

  • You will not quit a job where you currently work at least 30 hours per week.
  • You will not reduce your hours to less than 30 hours per week.
  • You will take a job if one is offered to you.

However, those who meet one or more of these conditions will be exempt from the work requirements listed above:

  • Already work at least 30 hours per week
  • Meet the work requirements for another maintenance of effort (MOE) program (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Supplemental Security Income, or Unemployment Insurance)
  • Are the caregiver for a child younger than 6 years of age or for a person who is incapacitated
  • Are physically or mentally unfit for work
  • Regularly take part in a drug or alcohol treatment program
  • Are a student enrolled in college or a training program at least part-time

Able bodied adults without dependents (ABAWD) will need to meet both the work requirements above and a specific set of requirements set exclusively for this group.

Able Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWD) Work Requirements

You are considered an ABAWD if you:

  • Are between 18 and 49 years of age
  • Do not have a disability
  • Do not have children

As an ABAWD, you must do one of the following:

  • Work for 80 hours per month
  • Participate in a work program for 80 hours per month
  • Work and participate in a work program for a total of 80 hours per month
  • Participate in a workfare program for a specific number of hours, which will depend on your SNAP allotment.
    *Find contact information for your state or territory in the section called “Contact Information by Location” to get in touch with a local office for more Information about workfare programs.

ABAWD applicants must register for work through their state’s online portal and cannot quit their job or cut back their hours under 30 hours per week. Also, they must take part in the SNAP Employment and Training or workforce program if they are assigned to do so by their state.

If you do not meet the above requirements, you will not receive SNAP benefits for 1 month after a first offense, for 3 months after a second offense, and for 6 months after a third offense.

ABAWD rules do not apply if you are:

  • pregnant
  • raising a dependent child (under 18 years of age) in your household
  • excused from the general work requirements described above, unless told otherwise by your state office

If you are an ABAWD and do not meet these ABAWD- specific requirements, you can only receive benefits for three months in a three-year period. This exception is known as ABAWD time limit.

ABAWD time limits can be waived temporarily if:

  • the state requests the Food Nutrition Service (FNS) to extend the time period because of a lack of jobs in the area
  • because the national unemployment rate is over 10 percent

Federal law requires that ABAWD only receive SNAP benefits for a period of 3 months. To receive benefits again after receiving them for 3 months, you must meet your state’s eligibility requirements and receive approval from your state office.

Student SNAP Eligibility

Able-bodied students between 18 and 49 years old qualify for SNAP benefits if they meet all income requirements, and meet at least one of the following requirements:

  • Receive public assistance benefits under a Title IV-A program
  • Take part in a state or federally financed work-study program
  • Work at least 20 hours per week
  • Be a single parent enrolled full-time and taking care of a dependent household member younger than 12 years of age
  • Take care of a dependent household member under the age of 6
  • Take care of a dependent household member age 6 through 11 and do not have adequate child care to work 20 hours per week or take part in a state or federally financed work-study program
  • Are attending college or certain other schools as part of certain job or employment training programs under either:
    • The Workforce Investment Act
    • Section 236 of the Trade Act of 1974
    • The Food Stamp Act
    • State or local guidelines

If you are studying part-time (taking two courses or 6-11 credits) or full-time (12 credits or more) and do not meet any of the requirements above, you will not be considered eligible.

SNAP for the Homeless or People Living in a Shelter

SNAP benefits are available to the homeless in the U.S. Homeless applicants who meet their state’s eligibility requirements can apply via the same methods as other applicants in the state where they reside.

A permanent address is not required to apply for SNAP. Homeless applicants can get benefits whether or not they are staying in a shelter or living with family or friends on a temporary basis.

You can use any of the following to receive your EBT card for benefits:

  • The address of an authorized representative
  • A shelter where you live
  • The local SNAP office

Talk to your eligibility worker to find out what will work best for you. You can find contact information for your state in the Contact Information by Location section of this guide. If you are under 18 and do not live with your parents, you can apply for SNAP on your own.

Your identity will need to be confirmed by the eligibility worker, either by calling your SNAP office or the shelter you live in. The following documents are valid as proof of identity:

  • Birth certificate
  • Social Security card
  • Voter registration card
  • Your work or school badge

If you do not have access to kitchen appliances to cook meals, use your SNAP benefits to purchase grocery store products that are ready to eat and do not need to be prepared. You can also use your SNAP benefits to buy food that can be prepared at your local shelter. Some soup kitchens and homeless shelters accept SNAP benefits as well.

Check with your SNAP worker about work requirements for your specific situation. The program can also help you get a job or access to training programs.

SNAP for Immigrants

Non-U.S. citizens can apply for SNAP, but it can affect their ability to receive a green card under the public charge rules.

Benefitting from any welfare program like SNAP can make the Department of Homeland Security label you a public charge and this counts against you in your green card application. The only non-citizens exempted from this rule are:

  • People who already have a green card
  • U.S. service members
  • Refugees
  • Asylees
  • Afghans and Iraqis with special immigrant visas
  • Certain nonimmigrant trafficking victims
  • People applying for a green card under the Violence Against Women Act

Reporting Household Changes

Your eligibility for food stamps can change if certain factors about your household change. Certain households will be required to report changes once per month, while others will only be required to report quarterly or twice a year. Others still only need to report changes when they occur. Your SNAP office will notify you of the guideline you must follow.

State SNAP offices require that you report changes to your:

  • Income or assets (earned and unearned). Report if a household member starts or leaves a job, or gets or loses access to funds. Refer to the sections called “Income Requirements” for more information on eligibility guidelines.
  • Address. In addition to reporting the new address, you will have to notify the program about changes in rent or utility costs.
  • Family size. Report if the number of people living in your household changes. Changes can happen when someone moves into or out of your home when a child is born, when someone dies or when someone gets married/ divorced

If you fail to report changes and continue to receive SNAP benefits that you are technically ineligible for, you will be required to pay them back.

The federal Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) recommends writing down the changes and mailing them to your local SNAP office. A second option is to call your local office by phone to report changes. Go to the Contact Information by Location section to find your local office contact information.

How to Apply for Food Stamps by Location

The SNAP program recommends that you apply for SNAP as soon as you need assistance. There is no waiting period to receive food stamps, but it will take time for your application to be processed.

Note: If after clicking on a URL you are not taken to the correct page, please copy and paste the URL into your browser for best results.

SNAP application methods vary by state: you can apply online, by mail, and in person.

To learn about the application methods available for your state, territory, or tribe in the dropdown menu below:

Alabama

To apply for food stamps in Alabama, either register on the site and apply online or download and print your application for submission by fax, by mail or in person to a state agency.

Apply online: https://mydhr.alabama.gov/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://mydhr.alabama.gov/content/forms/application-english.pdf
Spanishhttps://mydhr.alabama.gov/content/forms/application-spanish.pdf

Alaska

You cannot apply for SNAP online in Alaska. You need to download the application, fill it out, sign it and submit it by mail or fax. Find the submission information at the end of the application form.

Get printable application form: http://dpaweb.hss.state.ak.us/e-forms/pdf/GEN%2050C%20(06-3860)%20rev%2012.19.pdf

American Samoa

Information about the application process for ASNAP is not available. Please contact your local benefits office to learn more. Find out how to contact your local office in the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide.

Arizona

To get Nutrition Assistance in Arizona, apply online and submit both the application and documentation through the state portal. Or, request a paper application by phone or download your application online, print it, fill it out and sign it. Then send it either by fax or mail, or submit it in person.

Apply online: https://www.healthearizonaplus.gov/Login/Default
Get printable application form: http://arizonaselfhelp.org/static/applications/FA-001-English.585efd4b51e7.pdf

Arkansas

Apply online through the state portal or download your application, fill it out, sign it and send it by mail. Apply online: https://access.arkansas.gov/Welcome.aspx

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://humanservices.arkansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/Application_for_SNAP_and_TEA_DCO-0215.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.samcc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/SNAP_app_215-Spanish.pdf

California

To apply for CalFresh, California residents can either apply online through the state portal and upload their documents, call the CalFresh line or download and fill out the application and submit it in person at their nearest county office.

Apply online: https://www.getcalfresh.org/

Apply by phone: 1-877-847-3663

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://file.lacounty.gov/SDSInter/dpss/1060247_CF2856_19.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/spanish/CF285SP.pdf
Hmonghttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Hmong/CF285_HM.pdf
Japanesehttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Japanese/CF285_Japanese.pdf
Laohttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/LAO/CF285_LAO.pdf
Mienhttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Mien/CF285_Mien.pdf
Portuguesehttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Portuguese/CF285_Portuguese.pdf
Punjabihttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Punjabi/CF285_Punjabi.pdf
Russianhtts://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/russian/CF285_Russian.pdf
Tagaloghttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Tagalog/CF285_TAGALOG.pdf
Ukrainianhttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Ukrainian/CF285_Ukrainian.pdf
Vietnamesehttps://www.cdss.ca.gov/foodstamps/entres/forms/Vietnamese/CF285_VN.pdf

Colorado

Residents have the option of applying online for SNAP benefits through PEAK or they can print the application form, fill it out and submit it at the nearest state agency.

Apply online: https://coloradopeak.secure.force.com/ABWEL?Language=EN

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9eaXW7_92zSZjA5djJoX1JxSWc/view
Spanishhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/0BztoLK7fIWYlVFVYeWN4VWwybVFYWmhEOHpyUFBXcU Eycm1v/view

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)

To apply for the Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) in CMNI, heads of households can print, fill out and sign the application and submit it in person at the Certification Unit Office or to a NAP officer. Find the contact information on page 11.

Printable application form:
http://www.dcca.gov.mp/nap-nutrition-assistance-program/ [Scroll down and click on the Nutrition Assistance Program Application Packet image on the right to download.]

Connecticut

To apply for food assistance in Connecticut, residents can either apply online through the state website or download and print the application form and send it by mail or submit it in person at the nearest DSS office.

Apply online: https://www.connect.ct.gov/access/jsp/access/Home.jsp

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Departments-and-Agencies/DSS/Common-Applications/Application-for-Benefits-W-1E.pdf
Spanishhttps://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Departments-and-Agencies/DSS/Common-Applications/Application-for-Benefits–W-1ES—Spanish.pdf?la=en

Delaware

You have the option of applying for SNAP benefits online or downloading the application form, filling it out and turning it in by mail.

Apply online: https://assist.dhss.delaware.gov/Common/SystemCompatibility?Origin=ApplyforBenefits

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dss/files/form100e.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dss/files/form100s.pdf

District of Columbia

If you live in DC and wish to apply for SNAP benefits, either apply online through the DHS portal or download the application form and either send it by mail or visit the nearest DHS Service Center to submit it in person.

Apply online: https://dcbenefits.dhs.dc.gov/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/Combined_Application_December2015_(English_%202_0.pdf
Spanishhttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/Combined_Application_December_2015-Spanish_0_3.pdf
Amharichttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/Combined_ Application_v42_Amharic_Interactive_2.pdf

Florida

Residents can apply for the Food Assistance Program online through ACCESS Florida or they can download the application form, fill it out and submit it by mail, by fax or in person at any of the Department of Children and Families Economics Self-Sufficiency Services offices.

Apply online: https://dcf-access.dcf.state.fl.us/access/scrflhomepage.do?performAction=changeLocale&lan- guage=english

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://eds.myflfamilies.com/DCFFormsInternet/Search/OpenDCFForm.aspx?FormId=645
Spanishhttps://eds.myflfamilies.com/DCFFormsInternet/Search/OpenDCFForm. aspx?FormId=647
Kreyòlhttps://eds.myflfamilies.com/DCFFormsInternet/Search/OpenDCFForm. aspx?FormId=646

Georgia

You cannot apply for SNAP online in Georgia. You need to print the application form or request a paper application by phone, and fill it out and submit it via mail, by fax or in person at any local county office.

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dfcs.georgia.gov/media/9576/download
Spanishhttps://dfcs.georgia.gov/document/form/297spanishpdf/download

Guam

In order to get the application process started, you will need to fill out and sign the Application for Public Benefits form and either send it by email or submit it in person at your local Bureau of Economic Security (BES) office.

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://dphss.guam.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/ApplicationforPublicBenefits.pdf
Chamorrohttp://dphss.guam.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/DPHSS_Application4PublicBene- fits_CHAMORRO-FINAL.pdf
Chukeesehttp://dphss.guam.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/PBA-Chuukese-APPROVED-11.25.19.pdf

Apply by email: send your application form to PublicAssistance@dphss.guam.gov
If you wish to submit your completed application in person, find the contact information on the Contact Information by Location section of this guide.

Hawaii

Residents need to print the application form, fill it out, sign it and submit it in person. You will need to also bring the required documentation. The application form also includes the vote registration application form at the end, which you can choose to complete. Otherwise, simply tick the “NO” box.

Get printable application form: http://humanservices.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/BESSD-Application_June-2015.pdf

Idaho

Apply online through Idalink, by phone, or in person/by mail by printing the application form and submitting it with copies of the required documentation.

Apply online: https://idalink.idaho.gov/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://publicdocuments.dhw.idaho.gov/WebLink/DocView.aspx?id=1577&dbid=0&repo=PUBLIC-DOCUMENTS
Spanishhttps://publicdocuments.dhw.idaho.gov/WebLink/DocView.aspx?id=1576&dbid=0&repo=PUBLIC-DOCUMENTS

Apply by phone (toll-free): 1-877-456-1233

Illinois

Locals can apply online through ABE or download the application form and either mail it or submit it in person at any Family Community Resource Center.

Apply online: https://abe.illinois.gov/abe/access/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.dhs.state.il.us/onenetlibrary/12/documents/Forms/IL444-2378B-IES.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.dhs.state.il.us/onenetlibrary/12/documents/Forms/IL444-2378BS-IES.pdf

Indiana

Residents can apply online or download and print an application form to submit it at a local SNAP office. Apply online: https://fssabenefits.in.gov/bp/#/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://forms.in.gov/Download.aspx?id=12306
Spanishhttps://forms.in.gov/Download.aspx?id=12460

Iowa

To request SNAP benefits, residents can apply online through OASIS or download an application form and submit it by fax, by mail or in person at a local Department of Human Services office.

Apply online: https://secureapp.dhs.state.ia.us/oasis/OASIS0100.aspx

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dhs.iowa.gov/sites/default/files/470-0462.pdf?050520202156
Spanishhttps://dhs.iowa.gov/sites/default/files/470-0462S.pdf

Apply by fax: 202-690-7442

Kansas

Residents can apply for benefits online or they can do so by mail, by fax or in person. To submit their application offline, they simply need to download and print the application form, fill it out and sign it before sending it.

Apply online: https://cssp.kees.ks.gov/apspssp/sspNonMed.portal;acsspCookie=sITm3uTVlaRPNZWCSQYMQFNQ1YAY- C1GyS8YA1z3COd4gOnce9AoA!-308826953?_nfpb=true&_st=&_windowLabel=applyForBenefits_1_4&_urlType=action&_ state=maximized&wlpapplyForBenefits_1_4_javax.portlet.action=applyForBenefits

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://content.dcf.ks.gov/ees/KEESM/Forms/ES-3100.pdf
Spanishhttp://content.dcf.ks.gov/ees/KEESM/Forms/ES-3100SPA.pdf

Kentucky

Apply online for benefits through the Benefind portal, or print a copy of the form and mail it, fax it or submit it to a local Department for Community Based Services office in person.

Apply online: https://kynect.ky.gov/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationEnglish.pdf
Spanishhttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationSpanish.pdf
Arabichttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationArabic.pdf
Bosnianhttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationBosnian.pdf
Chinesehttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationChinese.pdf
Frenchhttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationFrench.pdf
Russianhttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationRussian.pdf
Somalihttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/1600389159000/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationSomali.pdf
Vietnamesehttps://kynect.ky.gov/benefits/resource/160038915900/sspSnapAsserts/ SNAPApplicationVietnamese.pdf

Apply by fax: 502-573-2007

Louisiana

To apply for SNAP benefits, locals will need to either submit an online application through the CAFÉ Customer Portal or print an application form and send it by fax, by mail or submit it in person at any Department of Children and Family Services office.

Apply online: https://sspweb.ie.dcfs.la.gov/selfservice/selfserviceJSPController?id=0.08774569067928584&tab=1&fromPi-lot=true

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/EconomicStability/Applications/ OFS4_4I.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/EconomicStability/Applications/ OFS%20SP%20Combined.pdf
Vietnamesehttp://www.dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/EconomicStability/Applications/ OFS%20VN%20Combined.pdf

Maine

Residents can apply online through the My Maine Connection platform. Otherwise, they can download the application form and, once it is filled out and signed, submit it in person at their local Department of Health and Human Services office or send it by mail or fax.

Apply online: https://www1.maine.gov/benefits/account/login.html
Get printable application form: https://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ofi/public-assistance/pdf/GeneralApp-080117.pdf

Apply by fax: 1-207-778-8429

Maryland

Apply online through the state portal or submit a paper application to the Department of Human Services by mail, by fax or in person.

Apply online: https://mydhrbenefits.dhr.state.md.us/dashboardClient/#/home

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://mydhrbenefits.dhr.state.md.us/fiaREST/GetPDF?pdfIdentifier=PVF_English_App
Spanishhttps://mydhrbenefits.dhr.state.md.us/fiaREST/GetPDF?pdfIdentifier=PVF_Spanish_App

Apply by fax: 800-332-6347

Massachusetts

Massachusetts locals can apply online for SNAP benefits or they can print the application form, fill it out and send it by mail or fax.

Apply online: http://www.mass.gov/vg/selfservice

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/english-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1/download
Arabichttps://www.mass.gov/doc/arabic-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Chinesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/chinese-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Frenchhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/french-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Haitian Creolehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/haitian-creole-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Italianhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/italian-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Khmerhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/khmer-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1/download
Koreanhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/korean-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Polishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/polish-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Portuguesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/portuguese-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Russianhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/russian-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Spanishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/spanish-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Vietnamesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/vietnamese-snap-benefits-application-snapa-1-0/download
Printable Application Forms for Seniorscolspan
Englishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/english-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Arabichttps://www.mass.gov/doc/arabic-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Chinesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/chinese-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Frenchhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/french-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Haitian Creolehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/haitian-creole-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Italianhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/italian-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Khmerhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/khmer-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Koreanhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/korean-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Polishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/polish-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Portuguesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/portuguese-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Russianhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/russian-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Spanishhttps://www.mass.gov/doc/spanish-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download
Vietnamesehttps://www.mass.gov/doc/vietnamese-snap-application-for-seniors-snap-app-seniors-0/download

Apply by fax: 877-382-2363

Michigan

Residents of this state can apply for food stamps online through the state’s MI Bridges platform or download and submit their application form by mail, by fax or in person at the nearest Department of Health and Human Services office.

Apply online: https://newmibridges.michigan.gov/s/isd-landing-page?language=en_US

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdhhs/MDHHS-1171_Assistance_Application_and_Program_Supplements_616030_7.pdf
Arabichttps://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdhhs/MDHHS-1171-AR_Assistance_Application_ and_Program_Supplements-Arabic_635043_7.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdhhs/MDHHS-1171-SP_Assistance_Application_ and_Program_Supplements-Spanish_635042_7.pdf

Minnesota

Either apply online or by mail/in person by downloading the paper application, filling it out and submitting it to your local county human services office. Residents of 60 or older have a different application form (DHS-5223F).

Apply online: https://applymn.dhs.mn.gov/online-app-web/spring/public/process-login?execution=e5s1

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://edocs.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Public/DHS-5223-ENG-pform
English for Elderlyhttps://edocs.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Public/DHS-5223F-ENG

Mississippi

Residents can either apply online through the Access MI platform or download the paper application form and turn it in by mail, by fax or in person at any local county office.

Apply online: https://www.access.ms.gov/Application

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.mdhs.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/GF-900-Application-for-TANF- and-SNAP.pdf
Spanishhttps://msegov.blob.core.windows.net/dommsdh/cwp/updated/SNAP_TANF_Spanish.pdf
Vietnamesehttps://msegov.blob.core.windows.net/dommsdh/cwp/updated/SNAP_TANF_Vietnamese.pdf

Missouri

Submit a printed and filled out paper application by mail, by fax or in person at any Family Support Division office, or complete your application online.

Apply online: https://apps.dss.mo.gov/fmwBenefitCenter/Account/SignInInfo.aspx

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dss.mo.gov/fsd/formsmanual/pdf/fs1.pdf
Spanishhttps://mydss.mo.gov/media/pdf/food-stamp-application-spanish

Montana

Apply for food stamps online, or download an application form, fill it out and send it via email. Apply online: https://apply.mt.gov/access/accessController?id=0.9425123149004698

Get printable application form: https://www.benefitscheckup.org/forms/mt_mdcd_msp_fs_tanf_application.pdf Apply by email: hhssspapplicationcustomersupport@mt.gov

Nebraska

Apply online through ACCESS Nebraska, or print the application, fill it out, sign it and submit it by mail.

Apply online: http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/ACCESSNebraska.aspx

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://public-dhhs.ne.gov/Forms/DisplayPDF.aspx?item=378 [PDF download]
Spanishhttp://public-dhhs.ne.gov/forms/displaypdf.aspx?item=379 [PDF download]

Nevada

To get food assistance, apply online or submit a paper application by mail.

Apply online: https://dwss.nv.gov/TANF/Access_Nevada/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dwss.nv.gov/uploadedFiles/dwssnvgov/content/Home/Features/Forms/2905-EG_Application%20for%20Assistance.pdf
Spanishhttps://dwss.nv.gov/uploadedFiles/dwssnvgov/content/Home/Features/Forms/2905-EGS_Application%20for%20Assistance.pdf

New Hampshire

Complete an online application through the NH Easy platform, or print the application and send it by mail.

Apply online: https://nheasy.nh.gov/#/apply-benefits

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://nheasy.nh.gov/forms/E/800.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dfa/documents/bfa-800-sp.pdf

New Jersey

To apply for food stamps, complete the online application or download a copy of the form, fill it out, sign it and send it by mail.

Apply online: https://oneapp.dhs.state.nj.us/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JEnglish.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JSpanish.pdf
Arabichttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JArabic.pdf
Bengalihttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1J%20Bengali.pdf
Chinese/SIMhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JChineseSim.pdf
Dutchhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JDutch.pdf
Gujaratihttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1J%20Rev%202014_ Gujarati.pdf
Haitian/Creolehttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JHaitianCreole.pdf
Hindihttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1J%20Hindi.pdf
Italianhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1J%20Italian.pdf
Koreanhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JKorean.pdf
Polishhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JPolish.pdf
Portuguesehttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JPortugueseBR.pdf
Punjabihttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JPunjabi.pdf
Russianhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JRussian.pdf
Ukrainianhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JUkrainian.pdf
Urduhttps://www.nj.gov/humanservices/njsnap/docs/wfnj-1j/WFNJ-1JUrdu.pdf

New Mexico

Apply online through the YesNM platform, or fill out a paper application, sign it and submit it by mail or in person at the nearest field office.

Apply online: https://www.yes.state.nm.us/yesnm/home/index

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.hsd.state.nm.us/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/HSD-100-revised-2_24_20-2.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.hsd.state.nm.us/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/HSDSP-100-Revised-2_24_20203.pdf

New York

Apply for SNAP online, or submit your paper application in person at any SNAP center.

Apply online: https://mybenefits.ny.gov/mybenefits/begin

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826.pdf
Spanishhttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826A-SP.pdf
Arabichttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826-AR.pdf
Chinesehttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826-CH.pdf
Haitian/Creolehttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826-HA.pdf
Italianhttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826A-IT.pdf
Koreanhttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826A-KO.pdf
Russianhttp://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826A-RU.pdf

For NYC applicants: If you live in NYC, apply online through the Access HRA platform and upload your documents through the NYC HRA Document upload app. Or, submit your form by fax (917-639-1111), by mail or in person at any SNAP center.

Apply online: https://access.nyc.gov/
Get printable application form: https://access-nyc-s3-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/2017/03/SNAP_ApplandRe-cert_EN.pdf

North Carolina

Apply for food benefits online, or download the application form and mail it or bring it in person to a Department of Health and Human Services office.

Apply online: https://epass.nc.gov/CitizenPortal/application.do

Get printable application form: https://files.nc.gov/ncdhhs/dss-8207-ia.pdf

North Dakota

Apply online or fill out a paper application and submit it by mail or in person to a local county social services office.

Apply online: https://apps.nd.gov/dhs/ea/oasys/public/main.htm
Get printable application form: http://www.nd.gov/dhs/info/pubs/docs/sfn-405-application-for-assistance.pdf

Ohio

Apply online for food assistance using the Ohio Benefits portal, or turn in your application form in person at a county agency.

Apply online: https://benefits.ohio.gov

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200
Spanishhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-SPA/pdf/
Arabichttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-ARA/pdf/
Burmesehttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-ARA/pdf/
Chinesehttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-ZHO/pdf/
Cratianhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-HRV/pdf/
Hindihttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-HIN/pdf/
Hungarianhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-HUN/pdf/
Koreanhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-KOR/pdf/
Polishhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-POL/pdf/
Russianhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-RUS/pdf/
Somalihttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-SOM/pdf/
Ukrainianhttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-UKR/pdf/
Vietnamesehttp://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07200-VIE/pdf/

Oklahoma

Apply online through the OKDHSLive platform, or download a form, fill it out and submit it to a local county office.

Apply online: https://www.okdhslive.org/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.okdhs.org/okdhs%20form%20library/08MP001E.pdf (requires Adobe to download)
Spanishhttps://qa-ncoa-forms.s3.amazonaws.com/ok_msp_mdcd_fs_application_spanish.pdf (requires Adobe to download)

Oregon

Apply for food stamps online, or print the application form, fill it out and submit it by mail, by fax or in person at the nearest local self-sufficiency office.

Apply online: https://apps.state.or.us/onlineApplication/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/de0415f.pdf
Spanishhttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/ds0415f.pdf
Arabichttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/da0415f.pdf
Burmesehttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/du0415f.pdf
Nepalihttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/dt0415f.pdf
Russianhttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/dr0415f.pdf
Somalihttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/di0415f.pdf
Vietnamesehttps://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/dv0415f.pdf

Apply by fax: 503-373-7032

Pennsylvania

Apply online via the Compass platform, or apply in person at the nearest county assistance office after you download your application form here and fill it out.

Apply online: https://www.compass.state.pa.us/compass.web/Public/CMPHome

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.dhs.pa.gov/Services/Assistance/Documents/Benefits%20Applications/PA-600-2-20-Final.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dhs.pa.gov/Documents/Services/Assistance/SNAP_Supplemental%20Nutrition%20Assistance%20Program/spanish%20benefits%20app.pdf

Puerto Rico

To apply for SNAP (or PAN, in Spanish), residents can apply online, by phone or in person at any of the local agencies.

Apply online: http://www.adsef.gobierno.pr
Apply by phone: 787-289-7632 / 787-981-8056 (toll-free)

Rhode Island

Apply online or by mail/in person by completing a paper application and submitting it to the nearest local Department of Human Services office.

Apply online: https://healthyrhode.ri.gov/HIXWebI3/CreateGenericUserAccount?accountFlow=true

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/assets/documents/DHS-2ApplicationForAssistanceRev09-16.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/assets/documents/DHS-2ApplicationForAssistanceSpanishR ev09-16.pdf
Portuguesehttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/assets/documents/DHS-2ApplicationForAssistancePortugueseR ev09-16.pdf

South Carolina

Apply online through the SCMAPP platform, or print the application form and submit it by mail, by fax, by email or in person at the nearest Department of Social Services office.

Apply online: https://scmapp.sc.gov/
Email address for applications: SNAPTANFInbox@dss.sc.gov

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dss.sc.gov/media/1244/3800-2015-04.pdf
Spanishhttps://dss.sc.gov/media/1724/dss-form-3800-april2018-spa.pdf

Apply by fax: 803-734-2012

South Dakota

Apply online through the SD DSS Online System, or fill out a paper application and submit it to a local Social Services office in person or by mail.

Apply online: https://apps.sd.gov/SS36SNAP/Web/Portal/SystemCompatibility.aspx
Get printable application form: https://dss.sd.gov/formsandpubs/docs/gen/301application.pdf

If you speak another language and need an interpreter to fill out the form, call 1-877-999-5612 to get assistance.

Tennessee

Apply online through the state portal or print the form and submit it in person at the nearest Department of Human Services county office.

Apply online: https://faonlineapp.dhs.tn.gov/.

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/hs/hs-0169/hs-0169.docx [Word document download]
Spanishhttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/hs/hs-0169/hs-0169sp.docx [Word document download]
Arabichttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/hs/hs-0169/hs-0169a%20FA%20application%20and%20addendum.docx [Word document download]
Somalihttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/hs/hs-0169/hs-0169s%20FA%20application%20and%20addendum.docx [Word document download]

Texas

Apply for SNAP online or by mail when you download and fill out a paper application.

Apply online: https://www.yourtexasbenefits.com/Learn/Home#login

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.yourtexasbenefits.com/GeneratePDF/StaticPdfs/en_US/H1010_Nov_2019.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.yourtexasbenefits.com/GeneratePDF/StaticPdfs/es_ES/H1010_Nov_2019.pdf

U.S. Virgin Islands

Apply for SNAP by completing a printable application form, which you can download online, request by phone or pick up at a local office. Once you fill out the form and sign it, submit it in person, by fax, by email or by mail.

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttp://www.dhs.gov.vi/financial_programs/documents/SNAPCashApplication-ENGLISH_Updated_001.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.dhs.gov.vi/financial_programs/documents/SNAPCashApplication-SPANISH_Updated_001.pdf

Apply by fax: 340-772-9591 (St. Croix) or 340–77-5449 (St. Thomas).

Apply by email: certoffice.stx@dhs.vi (St. Croix office),  or certoffice.stt@dhs.vi.gov (St. Thomas -St. John offices)

Utah

Apply for food stamps online, or download a printable application and submit it by mail, by fax or in person at a local office. 

Apply online: https://jobs.utah.gov/mycase/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://jobs.utah.gov/forms/61app.pdf
Spanishhttps://jobs.utah.gov/forms/61appsp.pdf

Apply by fax: 877-313-4717

Vermont

Apply for 3SquaresVT online, or fill out and submit your application form by mail or in person at the local district office.

Apply online: https://dcf.vermont.gov/mybenefits

Get printable application form: https://dcf.vermont.gov/sites/dcf/files/ESD/Forms/100-199/120.pdf

Virginia

Apply for food stamps online, or fill out a form to apply in person at the nearest local agency.

Apply online: https://commonhelp.dss.virginia.gov/CASWeb/faces/loginCAS.xhtml?MODULE_NAME=ALL_PROGRAMS&SERVICE_PROVIDER=COMMON_HELP&LANGUAGE=EN

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.dss.virginia.gov/files/division/bp/fs/intro_page/forms/032-03-0824-35-eng.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dss.virginia.gov/files/division/bp/fs/intro_page/forms/032-03-0824-34-spa.pdf

Washington

Residents can apply online for SNAP benefits or print a copy of the form, fill it out, sign it and either mail it, fax it or deliver it in person to any local Department of Social and Health Services office.

Apply online: https://www.washingtonconnection.org/home/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/FSA/forms/pdf/14-001.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001sp.pdf
Cambodianhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001ca.pdf
Chinesehttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001ch.pdf
Koreanhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001ko.pdf
Laotianhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001la.pdf
Russianhttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001ru.pdf
Somalihttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001sm.pdf
Vietnamesehttps://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/forms/pdf/14-001vi.pdf

Apply by fax: 1-888-338-7410

West Virginia

Apply for food assistance online, or print a form and mail it to your local office.

Apply online: https://www.wvpath.org/

Get printable application form: https://dhhr.wv.gov/bcf/Services/familyassistance/Documents/DFA_SNAP_1%20%2007_11_19%20–%20approved.pdf

Wisconsin

To get FoodShare in Wisconsin, apply online or download the application form and submit it by mail, by fax or in person at a local agency.

Apply online: https://access.wisconsin.gov/

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/forms/f1/f16019b.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/forms/f1/f16019bs.pdf
Hmonghttps://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/forms/f1/f16019bh.pdf

Apply by fax: 888-409-1979 (Milwaukee county) / 855-293-1822 (outside Milwaukee county)

Wyoming

Apply for SNAP benefits by mail, by fax or in person at a local DFS office. Download the application form, fill it out and send in whichever way you prefer.

Printable Application Formscolspan
Englishhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1r9Supds1XkerGakMvZVUjK5hCyhfM-co/view
Spanishhttps://drive.google.com/file/d/1VsvlJfjAM7EVvyrC6HD8RcetDQTXCYnE/view

You can also find your local office information in the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide.

Required Documents

When the time comes to complete your food stamp application, you will be required to provide personal and financial information and documents, as well as similar documents and details for those residing in your household. 

You will be asked to provide proof of the household member’s identity, citizenship/residency, income, Social Security Number, expenses, resources (if required), disability (if applicable), school attendance (if applicable), medical expenses (if applicable) and non-custodial parent information (if applicable).

Proof of Identity

  • Driver’s license 
  • State ID card 
  • Passport 
  • School ID 
  • Military ID 
  • Birth certificate 

Proof of Social Security Number

  • Social Security card
  • Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN)
  • Any document that shows your SSN 

Proof of citizenship/permanent residency status

  • Birth certificate
  • Naturalization certificate
  • Employment authorization card
  • Letter from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration (USCIS) indicating your status
  • U.S. passport
  • Any official USCIS documentation or correspondence

Proof of residency

  • Utility bill or bank statement
  • Copy of the most recent deed
  • Lease or rent receipt from your home address or stock certificate
  • Property tax records
  • Lease signed by landlord and tenant
  • Rent increase documents

Proof of earned and unearned income

  • Wages from employment
  • Child support you receive 
  • Worker’s compensation 
  • Government benefits from other programs 
  • Pensions 
  • Grants or scholarships 

Proof of paid or unpaid medical expenses (over $35 per month if you are elderly or disabled)

  • Copy of each bill and proof of payment (if paid)
  • Statement of health insurance premiums
  • Medicare prescription drug card

Proof of other expenses

  • Dependent child care or child support documents
  • Rent or mortgage agreement
  • Home insurance policy
  • Utility bill

Proof of resources

  • Bank statement or books
  • Copies of securities, bonds or stocks
  • Real estate deed or appraisal
  • Trust fund document
  • Credit union records

If you cannot provide documents to prove the above requirements, speak with a SNAP employee to discuss your options as you await your SNAP application results. Please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide for more information.

Your application can take up to 30 days to process.

If you find yourself in a serious situation where your family and/or you require immediate SNAP assistance, apply for expedited SNAP benefits and collect food stamps within seven days’ time.

Expedited SNAP Benefits

Expedited SNAP benefits (or expedited service or emergency SNAP benefits) are SNAP benefits that you get soon after submitting your application. The SNAP program provides expedited service to households with the most need.

If you meet the eligibility guidelines for emergency benefits, your SNAP office must provide you with benefits no more than 7 days after you submit your application.

To be eligible for expedited benefits, you must be eligible for SNAP benefits and meet one of the following criteria:

  • Your household’s monthly income is less than $150 and less than $100 in cash and in the bank.
  • Your household’s cash, money in bank accounts and monthly income are less than your household’s monthly housing expenses (rent or mortgage payments and utilities costs).
  • You or a member of your household is a migrant or seasonal farm worker and your household has little or no income at the time of applying. (Your state will decide what qualifies as “little income.”)

You do not need to request expedited SNAP benefits. The SNAP office automatically screens applications for expedited benefits eligibility when they are submitted. 

SNAP for Native Americans

According to the Code of Federal Regulations, Native Americans can apply to SNAP. However, in order to be eligible for SNAP, at least one member of the household must be part of a federally recognized tribal nation.

The application process for Native Americans to get SNAP benefits is the same as the process followed by the states. To apply for SNAP benefits, you must submit your application to the state wherein your tribe is located. 

You will need to complete the following steps:

  1. Meet the Eligibility Requirements
    Although most states and territories have similar requirements, check that you meet the requirements for your state before applying. Refer to the section called “Eligibility Requirements for SNAP” on this guide to learn more.
  2. Submit an Application
    Depending on the state your reservation is located in, you can either apply online, call by phone or download, fill out and submit the application form in person, by mail or by email. Please refer to the section called “How to Apply for Food Stamps by Location” on this guide to learn more.
  3. Complete an Interview and Provide Verification
    Interviews can be completed over the phone or in person at a local office, depending on the state. The caseworker will ask that you provide documents that support the information you submitted. If the caseworker requests more information or documentation after the interview, you will be given more time to obtain and present the requested documents. Please refer to the section called “Food Stamps Interview” on this guide to learn more. Once these steps are completed, the state agency will process your application and notify your household within 30 days of when the application was received.

Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR)

Although SNAP is available in all U.S. states and territories, local state offices or SNAP retailers can be located far away from reservations. These complications may deter households that live on a reservation from applying for SNAP. 

To ensure that reservation residents have access to food, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has developed the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations, also known as FDPIR, as an alternative to SNAP. Households that are already receiving Food Stamps cannot receive FDPIR benefits at the same time, and vice-versa.

Rather than benefits on an EBT card, the FDPIR provides eligible households with USDA-approved foods each month to help families get the nutrients they need to stay healthy. According to the USDA, 276 tribes benefit monthly from the FDPIR program.

Eligibility Requirements

To qualify for FDPIR, at least one member of the household must be a part of a federally recognized tribal nation and reside on a reservation (or in approved areas near a reservation or in Oklahoma). 

They will also need to meet the income requirements set by the federal government. The net monthly income standards households must meet is the sum of the SNAP net monthly income standard minus the standard deduction. These are:

Household sizeNet Monthly Income Standard (48 contiguous states)Net Monthly Income Standard (Alaska)
1$1,231$1,616
2$1,604$2,082
3$1,977$2,549
4$2,365$3,016
5$2,769$3,482
6$3,173$3,967
7$3,547$4,434
8$3,920$4,900
Each ad. member$374$467

Tribal organizations may also set additional eligibility requirements. To find out which are the additional requirements you need to meet, if any, contact your local tribal office. Find the contact information for your local tribal FDPIR representative here: https://www.fns.usda.gov/contacts?f%5B0%5D=program%3A23

How to Apply for FDPIR

To apply for FDPIR you will need to contact your local tribal office. Some tribes allow online applications, while others provide the application form for you to submit either by email, by mail or by fax. Check with your office to find out which application methods are available.

Food Items Available for FDPIR Beneficiaries:

  • Apple, cranberry apple, cherry apple, orange or grape juice
  • Applesauce
  • Apricots, pears, sliced peaches or mixed fruit
  • Blueberries
  • Cranberries
  • Fruit and nut mix 
  • Plums
  • Raisins
  • Peas, hominy, potatoes, tomatoes, sliced carrots, corn or mixed vegetables
  • Canned vegetable soup
  • Frozen peas
  • Tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce or tomato soup
  • Beef, beef stew, chicken or tuna
  • Frozen fine ground beef, round roast beef, boneless chicken breast or whole chicken, or boneless pork loin chops
  • Egg mix
  • Peanut butter
  • Roasted unsalted peanuts
  • Black beans, kidney beans, pinto beans, refried beans, vegetarian beans or great northern beans 
  • Cereals (corn flakes, squares, oat circles, rice crisps, wheat flakes)
  • Cornmeal
  • Crackers
  • Flour
  • Oats
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Tortilla
  • Bison
  • Catfish
  • Salmon
  • Cheese
  • Milk
  • Vegetable oil
  • Buttery spread
  • Butter
  • Soup

Food can be fresh, dried, canned, or frozen. 

Certification Period and Recertification Process

Once your benefits are approved, you will receive them every month for no more than a year, after which you need to complete the recertification process to continue receiving assistance. However, households with disabled or elderly members can get benefits for up to 24 months before having to recertify.

The recertification process will depend on the tribal organization. For more information, contact your local tribal office: https://www.fns.usda.gov/contacts?f%5B0%5D=program%3A23

Food Stamps Interview

Once your food stamps application is submitted to your designated state department, you must wait to hear from a SNAP representative. 

You will receive a phone call, a mailed letter or a notification on the state website requesting an interview with you. SNAP interviews are conducted by phone or in person and for the following reasons:

To confirm application information

To receive SNAP benefits, all of the information you supplied on your SNAP application must be confirmed by your state department. Both the information you offered on your food stamp application and the additional information obtained through any government databases will be reviewed. 

The department can ask you to provide additional documents to support information. If that is the case, you will get additional time to present proof that supports your claim.

To verify your identity

A representative from your local SNAP division will ask you questions to confirm your identity. You may be asked to provide supplemental verification documents if the ones you submitted are not valid for any reason. 

The ID confirmation process is also in place in order to rule out any cases of food stamp fraud.

To determine what kind of benefits you will receive

In some cases, SNAP applicants require expedited help. Your interview can help determine if you need emergency food stamps, or if you will receive regularly distributed SNAP benefits through a scheduled EBT card.

To review the work requirements

To receive SNAP benefits you must be employed or actively seeking work. A government representative will review your employment status or lack thereof and determine the limits of your food stamp assistance.

The size of your household (whether or not you have children or additional members residing in your household) will also come into effect when determining how much work you must do and how much you will receive in benefits.

To review benefits and reporting

Your interview will not only determine the amount of benefits you will be approved to receive, it will also give you the chance to learn the terms of your benefits. You will be asked to report to your state department regularly, so any changes in your income or household can be documented and reviewed in regard to your SNAP benefits.

To review your rights

The SNAP representative that contacts you regarding your application will also explain your rights. 

To offer support

Your SNAP interview is also beneficial for obtaining any additional help or information you need. Do not be embarrassed if you have any questions about the program or how it works.

If you do not hear from a SNAP representative to schedule your interview within a few days after submitting your food stamps application, notify your local office. 

The sooner your interview process is complete, the quicker your SNAP application can get processed and you can begin collecting your food stamp benefits. If you do not own a phone, request a SNAP interview at your local office. 

What to Bring to Your SNAP Interview

  • Proof of identity (for those listed on your application)
  • Proof of legal presence, if necessary (for non-citizens)
  • Proof of employment or job search support documents 
  • Household income statements
  • Questions about your SNAP application and/or benefits

Food Stamp Application Results

After your SNAP application has been submitted, and you have completed the interview, your individual SNAP case status will be determined. 

If you are approved to receive regular SNAP benefits, it can take up to an additional 30 days (after the 30-day application processing) to begin receiving your food assistance. Once you are accepted, set up your Electronic Benefit Transfer account. 

If your application was denied, please refer to the section calledHow to Appeal a Food Stamps Denial of this guide to learn about the steps you can take to file a SNAP appeal.

How much can I receive in SNAP benefits?

To determine the amount of money you will receive (your allotment) you need to:

  1. Multiply your household income by 0.3 (SNAP households are expected to spend 30% of their income on food). 
  2. Subtract that amount from the maximum monthly allotment for your household size in the chart below. The amount left is how much you will receive.

Find out the maximum monthly allotments by household size for 48 U.S. states and District of Columbia through September 2021 below.

Household SizeMax. Monthly Allotment
1$204
2$374
3$535
4$680
5$807
6$969
7$1,071
8$1,224
For every additional member+$153

The allotment amounts for Alaska, CNMI, Hawaii, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands are different. You can find them below:

Alaska Maximum SNAP Allotment Amounts

Household SizeUrbanRural 1Rural 2
1$251$320$390
2$460$587$715
3$659$841$1,024
4$837$1,068 $1,300
5$995$1,268$1,544
6$1,194$1,522$1,853
7$1,319$1,682$2,048
8$1,508$1,923 $2,340
Additional member+$189+$240+$293

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)

Household SizeSaipanTinianRota & Northern Islands
1$212$224$258
2$389$410$472
3$557$587$676
4$708$749$863
5$841$885$1,020
6$1,009$1,063$1,158
7$1,115$1,177$1,356
8$1,274$1,339$1,543

Hawaii Maximum SNAP Allotment Amounts

Household SizeMax. Monthly Allotment
1$375
2$688
3$986
4$1,252
5$1,487
6$1,784
7$1,972
8$2,254
For every additional member+$282

Guam Maximum SNAP Allotment Amounts

Household SizeMax. Monthly Allotment
1$300
2$551
3$789
4$1,002
5$1,190
6$1,428
7$1,579
8$1,804
For every additional member+$226

U.S. Virgin Islands Maximum SNAP Allotment Amounts

Household SizeMax. Monthly Allotment
1$262
2$481
3$688
4$874
5$1,038
6$1,246
7$1,377
8$1,574
For every additional member+$197

The funds you receive will be placed on an EBT card. Please refer to the section called “Electronic Benefit Transfer Cards” of this guide to learn more. 

If you think your benefit amount is incorrect, contact the SNAP office. If the office agrees, your benefit amount will be corrected. If not, you will need to appeal the decision in order to have your benefit amount changed. The appeal process is the same as the process you follow to appeal a denial of benefits. Please refer to the section called “How to Appeal a Food Stamps Denial” of this guide to learn more.

How long will you receive SNAP benefits for?

When a candidate is approved for SNAP, the candidate is “certified” for a set amount of time, called a certification period.

According to the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), states assign each household the longest certification period possible, which typically cannot exceed 12 months. However, some households qualify for even longer certification periods. These are:

  • Households with either disabled or elderly members, which can get up to 24 months of benefits. The state will need to contact the household at least once after 12 months.
  • Households residing on a reservation, in which case they must get a 24-month certification period. If the household moves from the reservation, then the state will decide whether to keep the certification period or shorten it. 

The federal government allows states to extend certification periods as long as the total period does not exceed 24 months for elderly or disabled households and 12 months for all other households.

Certification periods will be three months or less if:

  • The beneficiary is an able-bodied adult without dependents or ABAWD (learn more about ABAWD in the section called “Work Requirements” of this guide)
  • The circumstances of the household are unstable. Households are considered unstable when they have no net income.

The certification period will be between one or two months if: 

  • The household will not remain eligible for food assistance for long. This is the case with migrant and seasonal farmworkers who have periods of inactivity and need food assistance, or of any employee whose hours at work decreased but are expected to be increased soon.
  • The household completed an expedited SNAP application and information is still needed to complete verification. Once completed, a new certification period will be assigned.

When can certification periods be shortened?

According to CFR, no state can shorten the certification period of a household once assigned, unless the household has:

  • Become ineligible.
  • Failed to inform the department of any changes.
  • Failed to provide an accurate report of their income to the state agency when requested.

Electronic Benefit Transfer Cards

In 2008, when the Food Stamp Program officially became the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), vouchers and food stamp coupons were phased out in all U.S. states (U.S. territories CNMI and American Samoa continue to provide coupons). With these changes came the launch of the Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) card. 

With your SNAP acceptance letter, you will need to set up your EBT account. Follow the steps below to complete this process:

1. Speak with an EBT Customer Service Representative

Call the designated number provided by your state department on the acceptance letter to set up your EBT card. The process will require some verification to get started. Have your EBT card number handy so that you can show that your personal information lines up with your account information. 

2. Select a PIN number

Your EBT card will operate with the use of a PIN. The EBT PIN is your choice and is not assigned prior. Choose a number that is easy for you to remember.

Do not share your PIN number with anyone you do not want using your EBT card. Treat your SNAP funds as though they are cash. PIN numbers help prevent food stamp fraud and to protect your benefits.

3. Make food purchases

The funds approved by your state department will be loaded onto your EBT card immediately after your customer service transaction. Following the by-phone setup of your EBT card, you will be ready to use your card.

You will only have three attempts to enter the correct PIN when using your EBT card. You will need to wait a full 24 hours before resetting your PIN the following day.

If you are planning to travel out of state before your food stamp benefits are replenished, you can use your EBT card while in another state (but not in Puerto Rico).

Common Locations Where EBT Cards Are Accepted

The main types of locations that accept EBT cards are: 

  • Supermarkets.
  • Major retailers like Walmart and Target. 
  • Pharmacy chains like CVS Pharmacy and Walgreens. 
  • Gas station and convenience shops.
  • Farmer’s markets.
  • Food cooperatives.

To find out which retailers in your region are authorized to accept food stamps, enter your street address, city and state, or your zip code into the USDA SNAP Retailer Locator here: https://usda-fns.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=e1f3028b217344d78b324193b10375e4.

Shopping With an EBT Card Online

As of 2020, 35 states allow the use of EBT cards online to buy applicable items with SNAP benefits from approved retailers. 

The states that currently allow for this option and the retailers approved for online EBT purchases are as follows. 

StateApproved Retailers
AlabamaAmazon, Walmart & Wright’s Markets, Inc.
ArizonaAmazon & Walmart
CaliforniaAmazon & Walmart
ColoradoAmazon & Walmart
ConnecticutAmazon & Walmart
District of ColumbiaAmazon 
FloridaAmazon & Walmart
GeorgiaAmazon & Walmart
IdahoAmazon & Walmart
IllinoisAmazon & Walmart
IndianaAmazon & Walmart
IowaAmazon & Walmart
KentuckyAmazon & Walmart
MarylandAmazon, ShopRite, & Walmart
MassachusettsAmazon & Walmart
MichiganAmazon & Walmart
MinnesotaAmazon & Walmart
MissouriAmazon & Walmart
NebraskaAmazon & Walmart
NevadaWalmart
New JerseyAmazon, TheFreshGrocer, ShopRite & Walmart
New MexicoAmazon & Walmart
New YorkAmazon, ShopRite & Walmart
North CarolinaAmazon & Walmart
OhioAmazon & Walmart
OklahomaAmazon & Walmart
OregonAmazon & Walmart
PennsylvaniaAmazon, TheFreshGrocer, ShopRite & Walmart
TennesseeAmazon & Walmart
TexasAmazon & Walmart
VermontAmazon & Walmart
VirginiaAmazon & Walmart
WashingtonAmazon & Walmart
West VirginiaAmazon & Walmart
WisconsinAmazon & Walmart

You must first set up an account. Since you are shopping with food stamps, you must elect the “EBT” option as a method of payment. If you cannot set up payment with your EBT card, call the customer service department for assistance.

Once your account is verified and active, and your EBT card is accepted, start shopping. You must only select SNAP-eligible items. Please refer to the section called “Eligible Foods Covered by Snap” of this guide for more information. 

Some programs allow for in-store pick up, while others offer grocery delivery. Delivery costs are not covered by SNAP benefits, they will need to come out of your own pocket.

If you need assistance with your order, contact the customer service team at the online grocer with which you are shopping: 

How to Report a Lost EBT card

If you lose your EBT card, you must take immediate steps to report the issue. Speak with the EBT Customer Service department in your state.

The representative will take immediate measures to cancel your card, so that your food stamp budget is not accessible to anyone else who finds your EBT card. Any SNAP benefits lost will not be replaced due to a missing card.

How to Order a Replacement EBT Card

Request a new EBT card with the customer service agent assisting on your report. Your new card will arrive in the mail within seven days.

The USDA provides links to all state EBT websites here: https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/state-directory. Simply hover over your state to see its specific website link.  

Food Stamps Benefit Replacement

If the food that you purchased with SNAP benefits is destroyed or unsafe to consume, you may be able to collect up to one month’s maximum allotment amount in replacement benefits. 

If this happens to you, contact your local SNAP office to have your benefits replaced. The following are some examples of incidents that can result in damage to your home and the loss of safe-to-consume food:

  • Earthquake
  • Hurricane
  • Winter storm
  • Fire

  • Flooding
  • Tornado
  • Volcano
  • Power outages

For power outages, the SNAP office will establish a minimum length of outage requirement. This can be four hours, 12 hours, 24 hours or another time frame. Please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide for details on how to get in touch with your state office. 

How to Apply for Replacement Benefits by Location

Your benefits may not be automatically replaced. In most cases, you must file a claim to collect replacement benefits. Contact your SNAP office to report the loss within 10 days of the loss.

You will be asked to fill out official paperwork from your state office. Depending on your SNAP office, you may be able to submit the form online, by mail, by email, by fax or in person.

Include the following information: 

  • Name
  • Address
  • Social Security Number
  • County
  • Phone number
  • The dollar value of the food lost
  • The date of the incident

The SNAP office will verify your claim by confirming with the power company, emergency responders or other entities. Or, you may need to prove the power outage.  For example, a representative from your SNAP office may need to come to your home to verify damage.

If approved, your replacement benefits will be provided within 10 days of submitting your claim.

Most states impose no limit to the amount of times you can receive replacement food stamps. Contact your state office for more information. 

Select your state, district or territory in the dropdown menu below to learn more about how to submit a claim:

Alabama

To apply for replacement benefits, you will need to fill out Form PSD-BFA-1334, known as Affidavit of Loss. The form is not available online. Contact your local Department of Human Resources office to get the form.

The form will need to be signed. You can either sign in person at the office or have the form sent to your home. 

Alaska

The form required to get replacement benefits is not available online. Contact your local Department of Health and Social Services office to file a report.

American Samoa

The form required to get replacement benefits is not available online. Contact a local Department of Health and Social Services office to submit a request.

Arizona

There is no form to request replacement benefits. You will be expected to make a statement explaining how the food was lost or damaged.

Contact your local Family Assistance Division office to make a statement.

Arkansas

The form to request replacement benefits is not available online. Contact your local Department of Human Resources office to file a report.

California

Replacement benefits form: https://www.cdss.ca.gov/cdssweb/entres/forms/English/CF303.pdf

If you need help with the process, contact your local county office. Counties will decide whether to provide full or partial replacement on a case-by-case basis.

Colorado

The Affidavit for Food Destroyed in Misfortune form is not available online. Although most households qualify for six months to a year of benefits, some households qualify for even longer certification periods. These are:

  • Households with either disabled or elderly members, in which case they may get up to 24 months of benefits. However, the state will need to contact the household at least once after 12 months.
  • Households residing on a reservation, in which case they must get a 24-month certification period. If the household moves from the reservation, then the state may keep the certification period or shorten it. 

The federal government allows states to extend certification periods as long as the total period does not exceed 24 months for elderly or disabled households and 12 months for all other households.

You can also present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and confirmation that you are aware of the consequences of fraud.

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands

There is no form available to complete this process. You need to notify your Food Stamps office. Find contact information on the “Contact information by Location“section of this guide.

You need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and that you are aware of the consequences of fraud.

Connecticut

The form “Replacement of Food Purchased with SNAP Benefits” is not available online. Contact your Department of Social Services office to get the form.

Delaware

m you need to fill out in order to request replacement benefits is the following: https://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dss/files/form_324.pdf

Contact your Department of Social Services office for assistance.

District of Columbia

The form required to complete this process is not available online. Contact your local Department of Health and Human Services office to report your situation.

You will be asked to fill out a written affidavit or statement.

Florida

The form requested to replace benefits in Florida is not available online. Contact your local Department of Children and Families office to file a report.

Georgia

The form you will need to fill out to replace benefits in Georgia is the following: https://dfcs.georgia.gov/document/form/form-841-food-loss-replacement-form/download

The form can be mailed or signed in person at the nearest Department of Human Resources office.

Guam

The form is not available online. Contact a local Department of Public Health and Social Services office to file a report.

Hawaii

The form is not available online. Contact your local Department of Human Services office to file a report.

You need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and that you are aware of the consequences of fraud.

Idaho

The form is not available online. Contact your local Department of Health and Welfare office to file a report.

Illinois

The Request for Replacement of Destroyed Food (Form 1989) is not available online. Contact your local Department of Human Services office to get the form.

Indiana

The form you need to replace benefits in Indiana is the following: https://forms.in.gov/download.aspx?id=5018

The form needs to be filled out and submitted in person or sent by mail to: 
FSSA Document Center
P.O. Box 18120
Marion, IN 46952 

Iowa

The form you need to request benefit replacement is the following: https://dhs.iowa.gov/sites/default/files/470-2920.pdf?06112×0201959

Submit the form to the nearest Department of Human Services (DHS) office.

Kansas

You do not need a form. Contact your local Department for Children and Families to start the process.

You need to file a report at your nearest Department for Children and Families office and sign a statement to get the process started.

Kentucky

Form FS-70 (Request for SNAP Replacement) is not available online. Request the form at your local Cabinet for Health and Family Services office. Once signed, the form must be sent to the office.

Louisiana

The form you need to fill out to replace your benefits is the following:

Printable Replacement Benefit Formscolspan
Englishhttp://dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/OFS/SNAP/SNAP38_ENG.pdf
Spanishhttp://dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/OFS/SNAP/SNAP38_SP.pdf
Vietnamesehttp://dcfs.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/searchable/OFS/SNAP/SNAP8_VN.pdf

You can also call 1-888-524-3578 to request a replacement.
If you prefer, you can fill out the online form here: http://dcfs.louisiana. gov/form/snap-38-online

You can submit the form in several different ways:

  • Scan and upload the form online to CAFÉ.
  • Send it to the Document Processing Center by mail to:
    DPC
    P.O. Box 260031
    Baton Rouge, LA 70826
  • Send it by fax to 225- 663-3164
  • Submit it in person at your local DCFS Economic Stability office

Maine

The Food Supplement Loss and Replacement Request form is not available online.

Contact the Office for Family Independence to request a form at 1-855-797-4357 or request a form in person at your regional office. 

Maryland

The Food Replacement Request is filled out by the regional office. When you receive the filled-out form, you need to submit it either in person or by mail to your local office. 

Massachusetts

The form you need to fill out to request benefit replacement is available online.

Printable Replacement Benefit Formscolspan
Englishhttps://eohhs.ehs.state.ma.us/DTA/PolicyOnline/olg%20docs/form/16/snap-9b.pdf
Spanishhttps://eohhs.ehs.state.ma.us/DTA/PolicyOnline/olg%20docs/form/16/snap-9b_sp.pdf

This form can be submitted in different ways:

  • By mail to:
    DTA Document Processing Center
    P.O. Box 4406
    Taunton, MA 02780-0420
  • By fax to 617-887-8765
  • By uploading it at DTAConnect.com
  • In person at your local Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) office

Michigan

The form is not available online. Report your situation to your local Department of Health & Human Services office. 

Minnesota

The benefit replacement form you will need to fill out is the following: https://edocs.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Public/DHS-1609-ENG

Complete the form and submit it either by mail or in person at your local Department of Human Services office.

Mississippi

The form you need to fill out in order to request benefit replacement is the following: https://www.mdhs.ms.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/MDHS-EA-508-Fillable.pdf

Report your situation by phone, in person or in writing. However, you will need to sign the form and submit it to a local county office to start  the process. Contact your local office to get more information.

Missouri

Benefit replacement form: https://mydss.mo.gov/media/pdf/statement-lossreplacement-request-food-form

Send the filled-out form by mail, by fax or in person to your local Family Support Division office. If you need help filling out the form call 1-855-373-463.

Montana

No form is necessary. You can report the loss orally or in writing at your local Department of Public Health and Human Services office.

The statement or phone record must clearly explain the situation and that you are aware of the consequences of submitting false information.

Nebraska

The form is not available online. Contact your local Department of Health and Human Services office to file your report.

You need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and that you are aware of what will occur if you submit false claims.

Nevada

Form 2305-EF, known as the Affidavit of Claimant, is not available online. Contact your local Division of Welfare and Supportive Services office to get the form.

Benefits can only be issued if the request is made during the affected issuance cycle. Replacement benefits can be issued only twice in six issuance cycles.

New Hampshire

You can find the benefit replacement forms below:

Printable Benefit Replacement Formcolspan
Englishhttps://nheasy.nh.gov/forms/E/474.pdf
Spanishhttps://nheasy.nh.gov/forms/S/474.pdf

You can submit the forms in different ways:

New Jersey

The form is not available online. To learn more about the process, contact your local county welfare agency.

You need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and that you are aware of what will occur if you submit false claims.

New Mexico

The benefit replacement form is not available online. To learn more about the process, contact your local county welfare agency.

You need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food and that you are aware of what will occur if you submit false claims.

New York

To request a benefit replacement in New York, you will need to fill out one of the following forms:

Printable Benefit Replacement Formscolspan
English & Spanishhttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291.pdf
Arabichttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-AR.pdf
Bengalihttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-BE.pdf
Chinesehttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-CH.pdf
Haitian Creolehttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-HA.pdf
Italianhttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-IT.pdf
Koreanhttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-KO.pdf
Russianhttps://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/2291-RU.pd

Report your situation orally or in writing to your local Human Resources Administration office. Once you report the case, you will be asked to fill out and sign the form and submit it.

North Carolina

To start the benefit replacement process, you will need to fill out the following form: https://policies.ncdhhs.gov/divisional/social-services/forms/dss-1678-replacement-supplement-affidavit/@@display-file/form_file/dss-1678-ia.pdf

The loss needs to be reported either in writing (through the form or a statement) or orally (by phone or in person) to your local office.

North Dakota

Complete the following form to start the benefit replacement process: https://www.nd.gov/eforms/Doc/sfn00270.pdf

The filled out form or a signed statement can be faxed to the state office along with documents that provide evidence of the situation.

Ohio

The benefit replacement form can be found here: http://www.odjfs.state.oh.us/forms/num/JFS07222/pdf/

The form needs to be submitted in person or by mail to your local agency.

Oklahoma

The benefit replacement forms can be found below:

Printable Benefit Replacement Formcolspan
Englishhttp://www.okdhs.org/OKDHS%20Form%20Library/08FB012E.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.okdhs.org/OKDHS%20Spanish%20Form%20Library/08FB012S

Once filled out and signed, the form needs to be returned to your state office. Losses caused by power outages or appliance malfunctions (unless caused by another misfortune) do not qualify for a SNAP replacement.

Oregon

To begin the benefit replacement process in Oregon, you need to present a statement instead of a form. It must include an explanation of what happened to the food, a detailed list of the losses and that you are aware of what will occur if you submit false claims.

Households that have been issued two replacements in the last six months will not be eligible for more replacements.

Pennsylvania

To start the benefit replcament process, you will need to complete the following form: http://services.dpw.state.pa.us/oimpolicymanuals/snap/PA_1896_UF_3-13.pdf

The loss needs to be reported either in writing (through the form or a statement) or orally (by phone or in person) to your local office.

Puerto Rico

To begin the benefit replacement process in Puerto Rico, you will need to report the loss in writing to the Administración Nacional de Servicios Familiares.

Statements and requests filed within the first and 15th day of the month will get 100% of the benefits requested. If the household accessed benefits before the disaster struck, the household will receive 50% of the benefits.

Rhode Island

To request benefit replacement, you will need to fill out one of the following forms:

Printable Benefit Replacement Forms colspan
Englishhttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/Programs/SNAP-55RequestForReplacementOfFoodPurchasedWithSNAPBenefitsRev02-17.pdf
Spanishhttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/Programs/SNAP-55RequestForReplacementOfFoodPurchasedWithSNAPBenefitsSpanishRev02-17.pdf
Portuguesehttp://www.dhs.ri.gov/Programs/SNAP-55RequestForReplacementOfFoodPurchasedWithSNAPBenefitsPortugueseRev02-17.pdf

The forms need to be submitted either in person, by mail or by fax to your local office. You can only make one request for replacement benefits for the same incident.

If you have any questions, call the RI DHS Information line at 1-855-697-4347 or the URI SNAP Outreach Assistance line at 1-866-306-0270.

South Carolina

To request a benefit replacement in South Carolina, you will need to fill out the following form: https://dss.sc.gov/media/2338/affidavit-of-loss-form.pdf

The form needs to be filled out, signed and sent to your local DSS office in person, by mail or by fax.

South Dakota

The Affidavit for Replacement of Food Lost in Disaster (DSS-EA-344e) is not available online. The form needs to be filled out, signed and sent to your local DSS office in person, by mail or by fax.

Tennessee

To request benefit replacement, you will need to fill out one of the following forms:

Printable Benefit Replacement Formscolspan
Englishhttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/hs/hs-3003.pdf
Spanishhttps://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/human-services/
*Makre sure you download and open the forms with Adobe Reader.

The form needs to be filled out, signed and sent to your local DHS office.

Texas

To begin the benefit replacement process in Texas, you willneed to fill out one of the following forms:

Printable Benefit Replacement Formscolspan
English*https://hhs.texas.gov/sites/default/files/documents/laws-regulations/forms/H1855/h1855.pdf
Spanish*https://hhs.texas.gov/sites/default/files/documents/laws-regulations/forms/H1855/h1855-s.pdf
*Makre sure you download and open the forms with Adobe Reader.

The form needs to be submitted in person or by mail to your local agency.

Utah

The form is not available online. To learn more about the process, contact your local office. Keep in mind that only the amount spent and lost will be replaced.

U.S. Virgin Islands

The form is not available online. To learn more about the process, contact your local office.

Vermont

The Attestation of Loss and Request for Replacement of 3SquaresVT Benefits ( Form 271) is not available online. Contact your local office to get the form.

The form needs to be submitted in person or by mail to your local district office. If you need assistance, call the Benefits Service Center at 1-800-479-6151.

Virginia

The form is not available online. To learn more about the process, contact your local office. You can find the contact information in the “Contact Information by Location” section.

Washington

The form is not available online. The loss needs to be reported to your local office. You can find the contact information in the “Contact Information by Location” section.

West Virginia

To begin the process, you will need to fill out the following form: http://dhhr.wv.gov/bcf/Services/familyassistance/Documents/342/342_FORM_DFA_FS36.pdf

The form needs to be submitted to your local DHS office. The benefits will be received by the household within 2 days after the DHHR gets the signed form.

Wisconsin

To request benefit replacement in Wisconsin, fill out the following form: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/forms/f0/f00330.pdf

This form can be submitted in different ways:

  • Online by uploading the scanned form to ACCESS.
  • By mail to:
    MDPUPO Box 05676
    Milwaukee, WI 53205
    Or, if you live outside the Milwaukee county, to:
    CDPUPO Box 5234 Janesville, WI 53547
  • By fax to 1-888-409-1979 (Milwaukee) or 1-855-293-1822 (outside Milwaukee county).
  • In person at your local agency.

The replacement benefits have to be provided to the household within 10 days after the loss is reported.

Wyoming

The SNAP Replacement Questionnaire (DFS 304) is not available online. The loss needs to be reported either in writing or orally to your local office, which can give you the questionnaire. 

Once the situation is verified and the questionnaire signed, benefits will be available to the household in 24 hours.

Refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide for details on how to get in touch with your state office to request a form.

How to Appeal a Food Stamps Denial

If your food stamp application is denied, you will receive a notice in the mail explaining why. This notice will also explain that you have the right to appeal the decision. 

The appeals process is different from state to state. In some states, you may be able to write a simple letter requesting an appeal or be asked to fill out an official government form. You will also have a deadline for submitting your appeal, which varies by state. 

You may be able to file your appeal online, in person or by mail, depending on the state or territory you live in. Some states even include an appeals form with your SNAP denial letter.

You will be asked to provide the following details on your SNAP appeals form:

  • Name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Date of the decision you are appealing
  • Case number
  • Social Security Number

In some states, you may be asked to attend an informal meeting to discuss the reasons for your SNAP denial, along with any supporting information. A formal hearing can be scheduled if your case is not resolved or if you do not agree with the state department’s decision regarding your initial appeal. 

A neutral officer will attend the hearing and determine an outcome based on the rules and regulations of the SNAP program, evidence and witness testimonies. A decision will be mailed to you at a later date. 

If you cannot attend a meeting and/or hearing in person, let your SNAP division know, and arrangements can be made to accommodate you.  

If you are denied SNAP benefits, you must prepare to provide additional information. Collect the following items as support for your food stamp appeal and have everything ready before the conference or hearing: 

  • Income statements
  • Living expense receipts
  • Tax statements
  • Medical bills
  • Banking statements

Following your in-person appeal, your state department will make a decision regarding your SNAP application, based on your submitted documents and financial statements. 

SNAP Appeals Process by Location

If you have been denied food stamps and you do not agree with the decision, learn about the appeals process in your state below. 

If you are able to submit your request for an appeal to your local office, refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide for a link to your state’s office directory.

If you receive a denial notification or you received an allotment under the amount you expected to receive, you can request a hearing in writing or in person at the Department of Human Resources to appeal the decision. 

Once you submit your request, the state has to schedule the hearing and provide you with materials to prepare for your hearing. You can present your case before the appointed DHR authority by yourself or through legal counsel. The decision will be made no more than 30 days after the hearing.

Alaska

If you have been denied food stamps in Alaska, you have the right to request a hearing in person or in writing within 90 days of the denial notification. Fill out this form to do so: http://dpaweb.hss.state.ak.us/e-forms/pdf/GEN%2085%20(06-3641)%20rev%2009.20%20ADA.pdf.

The hearing will be scheduled within 10 days of getting the request. A pre-hearing will be scheduled to go over program rules and to discuss the issue.

The official hearing will be conducted by an impartial administrative law judge not affiliated with the Division of Public Assistance. You can present the case yourself or your legal representative can do it. Present evidence, witnesses and the DPA will present its own position. The administrative law judge will make a decision, but ultimately the final decision will come from the Office of the Commissioner.

If you disagree with the decision, appeal to the Superior Court.

You can reapply at any time before, during or after the hearing and your eligibility will be considered again.

American Samoa

Information on how to appeal a denial is not available. Please contact your local agency to request more information. For how to contact the DHSS, please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of this guide.

Arizona

You can request a hearing within 90 days of receiving the denial letter. To request an appeal hearing fill out the request form (https://des.az.gov/sites/default/files/dl/FAA-0098A.pdf?time=1588204800110) on the back of the decision notice or submit your own written or verbal statement to the Family Assistance Administration. The FAA has to schedule the hearing. 

A pre-hearing will be scheduled to discuss the particulars of the case, but you are not required to go. If a resolution is not reached, the hearing will be scheduled. The hearing officer will make a decision, which can be to affirm the FAA decision, reverse it in favor of your appeal, dismiss the appeal or request that other actions be taken. 

The final decision has to be made within 90 days of the initial hearing request. You can file a petition to review the case with the appeals board within 30 days of the hearing decision and the board will decide to either affirm the initial decision, modify it, reverse it or request additional information (remand) to the hearing office.

Arkansas

Once the DHS has decided on your situation, you will receive a notice of approval or denial. If you wish to appeal your denial, request a hearing by: 

  • Following the instructions behind the denial letter.
  • Calling or submitting this form (https://humanservices.arkansas.gov/images/uploads/resources/DHS-1200_%289-2019%29.pdf) or a written letter to the DHS county office.
  • Writing or calling the Appeals and Hearings Section:
    • Appeals and Hearings Section
      P.O. Box 1437,
      Slot N401
      Little Rock, AR 72203-1437 
    • Telephone – 501-682-8622 
    • TDD for Hearing Impaired – 501-682-6974 
    • FAX – 501-682-6605

Within 90 days of receiving the denial letter, you can appeal the decision and have your case reviewed in a hearing. The hearing official may decide in your favor or in favor of the DHS. You can hire legal representation for the hearing.

California

After you receive your denial letter, you have 90 days to request a hearing. You can request a hearing in different ways:

  • Online: https://acms.dss.ca.gov/acms/login.request.do
  • By phone: call the State Hearings Division toll-free number (800) 743-8525.
  • In writing: fill out the Request for State Hearing form on the back of your denial letter or write down a request on a separate piece of paper providing:
    • Your full name.
    • Your address.
    • Your phone number.
    • Your native language.
    • Name of the county.
    • Program involved (CalFresh).
    • Name and address of your representative (if you have one).

You can also attach a letter explaining why you disagree with the denial. Submit this request by fax to (833) 281-0905 or by mail to:

California Department of Social Services
State Hearings Division
P.O. Box 944243, Mail Station 9-17-37
Sacramento, California 94244-2430

Colorado

If your application to food assistance has been denied, request a fair hearing to appeal the decision within 60 days of the date of that notice. The denial letter will include the cause for denial, the date of the decision and how to appeal. 

Once you submit the appeal, you will receive a notice including the date of the hearing and where it will be held. You can hire legal counsel or represent yourself. 

The authority in charge of determining whether to approve or reject your appeal is an impartial hearing officer. The fair hearing decision will be provided in writing to you within 45 days of the appeal and will be sent to the Executive Director of the Department. You can appeal the decision and the director will be the one to decide if the initial decision will be affirmed, reversed or modified.

If you choose not to appeal the fair hearing decision in the following 15 days, the decision will stand and be considered final. 

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)

If your application for SNAP benefits it’s denied, the eligibility worker will send a Notice of Denial by mail. In the notice you will find the name, telephone number and address of the individual you will need to contact to get additional information, as well as information on the household’s right for a fair hearing.

To request an agency conference or fair hearing, write or orally make your request to the nearest Nutrition Assistance Office (NAP) within 10 days from the date of the notice of denial. Either fill out and sign the Notice of Disposition (NOD) and submit it in person or by mail to the Program Administrator’s office, or call the office to request a hearing.

The hearing must be scheduled, held and the resolution informed to the household no later than 60 days after the date the request was submitted. The hearing is conducted in person and you can provide witnesses and evidence to support your claim. The decision by the hearing officer will be final and binding.

Connecticut

If you are denied food assistance in Connecticut, you can appeal within 15 days of the date of the notice sent by the DSS. To request a hearing either:

  • Call the Office of Legal Counsel, Regulations, and Administrative Hearings at (1-800) 462-0134 or (860) 424-5760.
  • Fax a request to: (860) 424-5729.
  • Mail a request to:
    Department of Social Services
    Office of Legal Counsel, Regulations and Administrative Hearings
    55 Farmington Avenue
    Hartford, CT 06105

You have the right to examine all the documents related to the hearing, to get free copies of the material and to have an interpreter or a bilingual staff member to help you communicate, if you need it.

Delaware

You will receive a denial letter within 30 days following the application submission. If you failed to appear at your interview and received a denial letter, then you will need to reapply. If your application was complete and you were denied food benefits, then you can send an appeal in writing.

The DSS will then send the household’s documentation and reasons for denial to the State Hearing Office, and after examining everything it will send you a notification for the hearing. 

You can get legal representation or represent yourself in this procedure, and you need to explain why you should have been accepted and present evidence and witnesses, if any. Once the hearing is over, you will be notified of the decision (to uphold the DSS decision, reverse it or modify it).

District of Columbia

Once you receive the denial letter, you have 90 days to appeal the decision and request an administrative hearing. To appeal, send a letter to the DHS or the Office of Administrative Hearings, provide it in person, send it by email or fax, or call (202) 442-9094.

To request a hearing you need to include the following information in your letter:

  • A description of the problem
  • What you want the judge to do
  • Important information (dates, facts, notices, etc.)
  • A copy of the denial sent by the DHS
  • Full name
  • Contact information

You will be assigned a hearing date where an independent administrative law judge will hear the case.

You must attend the hearing and either represent yourself or hire legal counsel and present evidence and witnesses. Finally, the judge will issue a written decision. 

Florida

After you get the denial notice from the Department of Children and Families, you have 90 days to appeal the decision. You need to fill out an online form (https://www.myflfamilies.com/about-us/office-inspector-general/appeal-hearings/fair-hearing-request-form.shtml) or send your fair hearing request in writing by mail.

Mail written request to:
Appeal Hearings Section
1317 Winewood Blvd., Bldg. 5
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0700
Phone: 850-488-1429

Once the request is processed, you will be assigned a hearing and a hearing officer to make a decision on the case. This information will be sent to you by mail. You can get legal counsel and present evidence and witnesses to support your appeal.

Georgia

Contact your local county department within 90 days of receiving your denial notice to request a fair hearing. Submit the request to your local office in writing or by calling. 

Call this toll-free number to submit the request: 1-877-423-4746. 

The form you need to fill out and return to a Division of Family and Children Services office can be found by clicking here (https://odis.dhs.ga.gov/General/Home/DownloadDoc/3006371) and selecting Document 333.  

Once you submit your request, the local office must work to set up the fair hearing, which will be held by an Office of State Administrative Hearings representative. You can provide your own representation or hire legal representatives. Bring evidence that supports your case and witnesses. 

If you receive a second denial following the hearing, speak with the Division of Family and Children’s Services about filing a second appeal with a superior court, which is called judicial review. 

Guam

Information on how to appeal a denial is not available. Please contact your local agency to request more information. For how to contact the DPHSS, please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location”.

Hawaii

You have 90 days to appeal a denial of benefits by submitting a request for a fair hearing to your local branch office.  

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the local branch office must work to set up the fair hearing. During the hearing, you can hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the case. Bring evidence that supports your case and bring witnesses. 

If you are not satisfied with the outcome, you will be notified of your right to a second appeal with the circuit court. This is also known as a judicial review.

To begin the process of requesting a fair hearing, fill out this form, https://humanservices.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/DHS-1461-Request-for-a-Hearing-_BESSD_.pdf, and send it to your local processing office. 

Find contact information for processing offices here: https://humanservices.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Statewide-Processing-Centers-04-2018.pdf.  

Idaho

You have 90 days to appeal a denial of benefits following the date your denial letter was mailed. To appeal, you must submit a request for a fair hearing to the Department of Health and Welfare. You may do so in one of the following ways: 

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the Department must work to set up the fair hearing. You can hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the hearing. Bring evidence that supports your case and bring witnesses. 

If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the hearing, you will be notified of your right to a further appeal with a superior court, also known as a judicial review.

Illinois

You must appeal a decision you do not agree with within 90 days. File an appeal in the following ways: 

  • By going online to https://abe.illinois.gov/abe/access/appeals
  • By writing a letter requesting a hearing and sending it via email to DHS.BAH@Illinois.gov
  • By writing a letter and faxing it to 312-793-3387
  • By writing a letter and mailing it to:
    Illinois Department of Human Services
    Bureau of Hearings
    69 W. Washington, 4th Floor
    Chicago, Illinois 60602

Instead of writing a letter, obtain a Notice of Appeal Form from a local Department of Human Services office and submit that. You can also call 1-800-435-0774 or 1-877-734-7429 (TTY) to request a hearing.

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the Department must work to set up the fair hearing. During the hearing, you can hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the case. Bring evidence that supports your case, and you may bring witnesses. 

Once a decision is made, you will get a letter explaining the decision and your right to a further appeal. If you do not agree with the hearing officer, you may request that a judge review the decision through a second appeal. 

Indiana

If you do not agree with the state’s decision to deny you benefits, request a fair hearing within 90 days. To begin this process, ycontact the Office of Family Resources in writing or over the phone. 

Find a DFR office near you here: https://www.in.gov/fssa/dfr/2999.htm. Call the DFR toll-free at 1-800-403-0864. 

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the office must work to set up the fair hearing where a representative of the Family and Social Services Administration will decide if the DFR made the right decision in your case. 

During the hearing, you can hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the case. Bring evidence that supports your case and bring witnesses. 

If you are not satisfied with the decision, request a review of the decision. You must submit a request in writing to the Hearing and Appeals section within 10 days of being notified about the decision. Instructions on how to make this appeal will be provided by the state. 

Following another negative decision, ile an appeal for a judicial review, where a superior court will review the case and hand down a decision.

Iowa

If you do not agree with the state’s decision to deny you benefits, request a fair hearing within 90 days of the date on the denial notice. It can be submitted in any of the following methods: 

After submitting your request, the office must work to set up the fair hearing. During the hearing, you can represent yourself or hire legal representatives. Bring evidence and witnesses that support your case. 

If you do not agree with the hearing decision, you may file a request for a rehearing within 20 days. You may also file a follow-up appeal through the district court within 30 days of the final decision in order to have a superior court review the case..

Kansas

You must request an appeal within 90 days of the denial notice. To do so, contact your local Department of Children and Families office. 

After submitting your request for an appeal, the DCF office will forward it to the Office of Administrative Hearings to set up a fair hearing. During the hearing, you can hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the case. Bring the summary of your case, evidence and witnesses that support your case.

If you receive another negative decision after the hearing, request a review of your case by the State Appeals Committee. Send your request in writing within 15 days of the hearing decision to the following address:
State Appeals Committee
Office of Administrative Hearings
1020 S. Kansas Ave.
Topeka, Kansas 66612-1327

Include why you are not satisfied with the decision. 

If you receive a negative decision from the State Appeals Committee as well, file another appeal to the district court to have a judge review your case. 

Kentucky

You have 90 days from the date you receive your food stamps decision letter to request a hearing of appeals. Request the hearing in the following ways:

  • Call 1-855-306-8959.
  • Write a signed and dated letter explaining why you are requesting a hearing and submit it in person to any DCBS office.
  • Write a signed and dated letter explaining why you are requesting a hearing and mail it to:
    Cabinet for Health and Family Services
    Division of Administrative Hearings
    Families and Children Administrative Hearings Branch
    105 Sea Hero Road, Suite 2
    Boise, ID 83720-0026

Louisiana

If you disagree with the DCFS’s decision on your SNAP case, you have 90 days from the date of the decision to appeal by requesting a fair hearing. Request a hearing in one of the following ways:

  • Call 1-888-524-3578 and select options 1-3-1-5-1.
  • Follow the instructions on the decision letter. Complete and sign the section under “Fair Hearing Information” and mail the form to the address on the letter.
  • Send a letter explaining why you are requesting a hearing, and include your name and case/CAFE number (or SSN) to:
    DCFS Economic Stability
    P.O. Box 260031
    Baton Rouge, LA 70826

Maine

If you disagree with the denial of your benefits, request a fair hearing within 30 days from the date you received the denial letter. You can do so in writing or in person at your local DHHS office, or appeal by:

  • Sending a letter explaining the reason for requesting a hearing to:
    Maine Department of Health and Human Services
    Division of Administrative Hearings
    109 Capitol Street
    11 State House Station
    Augusta, ME 04333-0011
  • Calling 207-624-5350 (TTY:711)
  • Faxing the letter to 207-287-8448

You will receive a scheduling letter from the Division of Administrative Hearings indicating the date, time and place of the hearing. A hearing officer will be appointed to lead the hearing and will make a recommendation based on the evidence presented and witness testimonies provided by the DHHS and by you.

The hearing can be conducted by phone, but it is always best to attend in person, if possible. Witnesses can also testify by phone, but you will need to inform the hearing officer and make the necessary arrangements.

Once the hearing is over, you will receive a written decision by mail within 30 days. Generally, the hearing officer’s decision is the final decision. However, sometimes the officer’s decision will be considered as a recommendation and the Commissioner will have the final say.

If you do not agree with the decision of the hearing officer, write to the Commissioner within 7 to 20 days to explain your opinion. If you want to appeal the decision of the Commissioner, appeal to the Superior Court within 30 days.

Maryland

You have 90 days from the denial notice date to request a hearing. 

To request a hearing in Maryland, simply contact your local Department of Social Services office by mail, in person or by phone. A representative will help you with your request. 

You can also mail your hearing request to the Office of Administrative Hearings by following these instructions:

  1. Click on the following link or paste the URL into your browser’s address bar: https://dhs.maryland.gov/documents/Manuals/A%20Guide%20on%20Administrative%20Hearing%20Procedures/Hearing%20Guide%203.2017%20FINAL.pdf
  1. Print the form on page 13 and complete it.
  2. Mail the form to the following address:
    Office of Administrative Hearings
    Administrative Law Building
    11101 Gilroy Road
    Hunt Valley, MD 21031-1301

Massachusetts

If you disagree with the denial letter, appeal the decision through the Division of Hearings. Request a hearing in any of the following ways:

  • By faxing the form or letter to 617-348‐5311.
  • By requesting a hearing verbally by calling 617-348-5321. For TTY call 711 or 800- 439‐2370.

The form must be submitted within 90 days from the date you received the denial letter. You will receive a scheduling notice with the date, time and location 15 days before the hearing. If you cannot attend, call at least one day before the hearing to reschedule. 

The hearing officer will lead the hearing, hear the witnesses, look at the evidence and make a decision. This decision will be mailed to you no later than 30 days after the hearing. If you disagree with the decision of the officer, appeal it to a Superior Court within 30 days of getting the decision letter.

If denied again, your benefits will continue until the end of the hearing or the end of your certification period, whichever comes first. 

Michigan

To appeal the decision made by the Department of Health and Human Services, you will need to request a fair hearing in person at the nearest MDHHS office or by calling 517-335-7519.

An officer will be appointed to your case and the appointment will need to be signed by you. You can appoint an authorized representative to represent you in the hearing, or you can represent yourself. You will be asked to provide evidence to support your case and may present witnesses. 

Minnesota

To appeal a SNAP denial in Minnesota, you will need to request a fair hearing with the Appeals Division of the DHS. Appeals can be submitted in the following ways:

  • Online: https://edocs.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Public/DHS-0033-ENG-eform
  • By mail: send your application form to:
    Minnesota Department of Human Services Appeals Office
    P.O. Box 64941
    St. Paul, MN 55164-0941
  • By phone: call 651-431-3600 or 800-627-3529 (TTY) to verbally request a hearing.
  • By fax: send the filled-out request form to 651-431-7523.

You must file the appeal within 30 days from the date of the denial letter.

A judge will hear the case, review the evidence presented by the DHS and by you, and make a recommendation. The judge’s recommendation will then be reviewed by the chief human services judges (delegates of the Commissioner’s office) and they will issue a final decision up to 60 days after the hearing.

During the hearing you can present witnesses to attest to your situation as well as evidence that supports your claim. The DHS representative will do the same. Most hearings are held by phone, although if requested, you can have it in person. In some cases a prehearing conference can be scheduled to plan how the hearing will be held.

If you disagree with the final decision, request a review through the Commissioner’s office or appeal to the state district court. In both cases, you have to issue the request no later than 30 days after the final decision was made.

Mississippi

Every household can request a fair hearing to appeal a denial. Once you request the hearing, you will be mailed a notice with the date and time of the hearing, which will be held by telephone.

Request a fair hearing in person, by phone or by mail either by going through your county office or the state office. Ether of which will enter the data into the system. 

The county director or their designee will have to initiate a review of the facts and the denial itself to see whether the decision was right or wrong. From there, they can schedule an agency conference with you to try and reach a mutual agreement. 

If the hearing stands, the state Office of Administrative Hearings will schedule a date for the hearing and you can present evidence and witnesses to support your claim. The representative of the DHS may do the same. The hearing officer will make a decision and you will be notified by mail up to 60 days after receiving the hearing request. This decision is final.

Missouri

You have the right to request a fair hearing with an impartial party so that the denial can be reviewed and reconsidered. The Administrative Hearings Unit (AHU) of the Family Support Division (FSD) is in charge of scheduling the hearing.

Request a hearing in writing by mail or fax or orally by phone or in person within 90 days of the date the denial letter was issued. All hearing requests must be accepted. 

The person receiving the request will review the information of the case. If there was a mistake, then they can rescind the denial. If that is not the case, a pre-hearing conference will be scheduled to discuss how to continue and to see if the case can be resolved then and there. If it is not solved, a hearing will be scheduled.

An impartial officer will hold the hearing and make a decision after reviewing the case, hearing the witnesses and looking at the evidence. You will be notified of the decision no later than 60 days after the hearing was requested.

Contact Information by Region

Central Missouri

  • Mailing address:
    PO Box 1527
    Jefferson City, MO 65102 
  • Fax number: 573-751-0335
  • Telephone number: 573-751-0335
  • Email: DLS.JCIMHRG@dss.mo.gov

Eastern Missouri

  • Mailing address:
    103 N Main, #202
    Independence, MO 64050
  • Fax number: 816-325-5918
  • Telephone number: 314-877-2072
  • Email: DLS.KCIMHRG@dss.mo.gov

Western Missouri

  • Mailing address:
    8501 Lucas and Hunt
    Suite 110
    St. Louis, MO 63136
  • Fax number: 314-877-2173
  • Telephone number: 816-325-5918
  • Email: DLS.STLIMHRG@dss.mo.gov

Montana

If you disagree with the denial, request a fair hearing within 90 days of the date of the notice. You can request a hearing in writing or verbally in the following ways:

  • By mail: send in the form attached to your denial letter or write a letter explaining the reasons for the request and send it to:
    Department of Public Health and Human Services
    Office of Fair Hearings
    PO Box 202953
    2401 Colonial Drive, Third Floor
    Helena, MT 59620
  • By telephone: call 406-444-2470 and verbally request a hearing.
  • By fax: send the filled out form or a letter to 406-444-3980.
  • By email: send the filled out form or a letter to hhsofh@mt.gov.

The Office of Fair Hearings  will be in charge of scheduling and conducting hearings.

You will also have the chance to take part in an administrative review to review the status of the household. This can lead to an informal resolution, but unless you withdraw your request, the hearing will take place.

You will receive a hearing appointment notice with the date and time. A hearing officer will be in charge of leading the hearing and making a summary judgement. The decision will be made no later than 60 days after the date the hearing request was issued.

Appeal the decision of the hearing officer to the Board of Public Assistance no later than 10 days after the date the decision is issued.

Nebraska

If you disagree with your benefits application denial and want to appeal, request a fair hearing within 90 days of the date of the denial letter. You can request the hearing verbally or in writing.

To send the form in writing by mail, simply fill out three copies of the hearing request form (http://public-dhhs.ne.gov/Forms/DisplayPDF.aspx?item=232). One copy has to be sent to the legal services office to:
Legal Services – Hearing Section
P.O. Box 98914
Lincoln, Nebraska 68509-8914

The other copy of the form has to be sent to your local county office. The third copy is for you to keep.

You can also write a letter explaining the reasons for your request and send that instead of the form.

The hearing needs to be held and a decision needs to be made within 60 days of the household’s appeal request.

Hearings will be conducted in Lincoln, Nebraska by a hearing officer and you can attend by phone or in person. A hearing officer will be in charge of conducting the hearing and making a recommendation. The Health and Human Services Legal Division will be in charge of informing you of the decision once it is made.

Nevada

If you wish to appeal a benefits denial, you will need to request a hearing. Submit the request orally or in writing within 90 days of the date of the denial letter to the welfare office handling your case. This will be included in the denial letter.

Once the request is received, the hearing officer will review the denial and the evidence, prepare a summary and schedule a hearing. A pre-hearing conference can be scheduled to see whether or not the case can be resolved without a hearing.

Hearings are normally held by telephone. Both parties, including you, can present evidence and witnesses to support the case. After these are presented, a hearing officer will make a decision and you will be notified no later than 10 days after the hearing. 

The hearing officer can ask for additional information in order to make their decision.

New Hampshire

If you want to appeal your state’s decision to deny you benefits, you need to request a fair hearing to the Administrative Appeals Unit (AAU), an impartial authority in charge of scheduling and holding hearings. 

Requests must be submitted no later than 30 days after the date of the denial notice. They may be submitted in writing or verbally in any of the following ways:

  • By email: send the form or letter to dhhs.aau@dhhs.nh.gov (only available during a state of emergency). 

After submitting a request, you will be notified of the date, time and place of the hearing so that you can prepare accordingly. Hearings are held in person. You can present evidence and witnesses in support of your case. 

To submit your request verbally or if you have any questions, call 603-271-4292 or 1-800-852-3345 ext. 4292.  

New Jersey

If you do not agree with the state’s decision to deny you benefits, request a fair hearing within 90 days of being notified. Submit your request in writing or verbally to a local county welfare agency. 

After submitting your request for an appeal, the county welfare agency must work to set up the fair hearing, which will be presided over by an administrative law judge with no connection to the case. 

You can hire a legal representative or represent yourself in the case. If you have any evidence or witnesses to support your case, bring them.

If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the fair hearing, speak with a county welfare agency worker about how to request a second appeal at a superior court. 

New Mexico

If you do not agree with the state’s decision to deny you benefits, request a fair hearing within 90 days through your local Human Services Department office.

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the local office must work to set up the fair hearing. During the hearing, you can either hire legal representatives or represent yourself in the case. Bring evidence that supports your case, and even witnesses. 

If you are not satisfied with the outcome, the letter containing the decision will include details on how to file a further appeal also known as a judicial review with a superior court. The letter will include details on the steps to take and the timeframe for completing these steps. You have 30 days from the hearing decision to request a judicial review. 

New York

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the local office must work to set up the fair hearing. During the hearing, you can hire legal counsel or represent yourself. Bring evidence that supports your case and present witnesses. 

If you are not satisfied with the outcome, speak with your local office about further levels of appeals in superior courts.

North Carolina

Appeal a denied application within 90 days of the decision by requesting a fair hearing through your local office. 

After submitting your request for an appeal in writing or orally, the local office must work to set up the fair hearing. Your case will be reviewed by a social services representative who was not involved in the original decision. 

During the hearing, you can represent yourself in the case or hire legal representatives. Bring evidence and witnesses that support your case.

If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the hearing, submit a second appeal request to the State Department of Health and Human Services within 15 days of receiving the hearing decision. 

North Dakota

You can appeal a denied application within 90 days by submitting in writing or orally to your county office. 

After submitting your request for an appeal, the county office must work to set up the fair hearing. You can represent yourself or hire legal counsel. Bring evidence that supports your case and present witnesses. 

If the hearing officer rules in favor of the state, request a second appeal through a superior court. Further information about this appeal will be provided by the state following another decision of denial.

Ohio

Appeal a denied application within 90 days of the decision by requesting a fair hearing. During the hearing, you can represent yourself in the case or hire a legal representative. Provide evidence that supports your case and present witnesses. 

If you are dissatisfied with the hearing decision, appeal a second time through the Office of Legal Services, which will review the decision and establish an Administrative Appeal decision. If you disagree with this decision as well, appeal one more time through the Common Pleas Court. 

To begin the appeal process, submit a request for a fair hearing in one of the following ways: 

  • By filling out this form online, https://secure.jfs.ohio.gov/ols/RequestHearing/
  • By calling the Consumer Access Line at 866-635-3748
  • By sending a request via fax to 614-728-9574
  • By sending a request via email to bsh@jfs.ohio.gov with the subject line “State Hearing Request”
  • By mailing a request to:
    ODJFS Bureau of State Hearings
    P.O. Box 182825
    Columbus, Ohio 43218-2825
  • By working with a caseworker at your local office

Oklahoma

Appeal a denied application by contacting your local Department of Human Services office, explaining why you are dissatisfied with the decision and asking for a hearing. 

The local office must work to set up the hearing for you. You can represent yourself in the case or hire legal counsel. Bring evidence that supports your case and present witnesses.  

If the hearing officer rules in favor of the DHS, request a second appeal through a superior district court within 10 days. Further information about this second appeal will be provided by the DHS after a second decision of denial.

Oregon

To appeal a denied application submit your request orally or in writing by submitting the Administrative Hearing Request (https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/HealthyPeopleFamilies/wic/Documents/administrative-hearing-request.pdf) to a local DHS office within 90 days. 

During the hearing, you can represent yourself in the case or hire legal representatives. Bring evidence that supports your case and present witnesses.  

The administrative law judge will choose to either have the hearing via telephone or in person. 

In the event that you do not agree with the outcome, file a second appeal with a superior court. You will find information on the specific steps to take in the letter detailing the judge’s decision.

Pennsylvania

To appeal a denied application within 90 days by requesting a fair hearing. This can be done in the following ways:

When it comes to the fair hearing, which can be done over the telephone or in person, bring evidence to support your case and witnesses to testify on your behalf. 

In the event the judge rules in favor of the county assistance office and denies your request for benefits, take your appeal to a superior court. The judge’s decision letter will explain the next steps you need to take. 

Rhode Island

To appeal a denied application, submit a request within 90 days in the following ways: 

In terms of the hearing process, you have the right to legal representation or to represent yourself. You must present evidence in support of your case and bring witnesses. If you do not agree with the decision at the end of the hearing, bring the case to a superior court for judicial review. 

South Carolina

You have to appeal a denied application within 90 days either in writing or orally to the DSS in order to begin the process. 

Request a fair hearing by calling one of the following numbers: 

  • Toll-free: 1-800-311-7220
  • If you are local: 803-898-8080 
  • TTY: 1-800-311-7219

After submitting a request, you will be sent the DSS Brochure 2410, the Fair Hearings Brochure. You do not have to fill out a form, as that is the responsibility of the Agency during this process. You are responsible for gathering and submitting the evidence you wish to present during the hearing. You can represent yourself during the case or hire a legal representative. 

If you receive another adverse decision, file for a reconsideration within 10 days. This gives you the chance to explain why you disagree with the decision and provide more evidence. 

If the reconsideration does not result in a positive outcome, file for a second appeal with the Administrative Law Court for a judicial review. This brings your case to a superior court. You must submit a request for this appeal within 30 days of the fair hearing decision. 

South Dakota

Appeal a denied application within 90 days by submitting a request in writing or orally to a local DSS office in order to begin the process. 

When you submit a request to your local office, they must complete Form DSS-EA-319, Oral/Written Request for Administrative Hearing on your behalf in order to begin the process. 

During the hearing, you will be able to present evidence and have legal representation in order to attempt to overturn the original denial notice. If the hearing results in another denial, request a judicial review and bring your case to a superior court to have the decision reviewed.  

Tennessee

You need to appeal a denied application within 90 days either in writing (by mail or in person) or orally (by phone or in person) to a county office. Depending on how you requested your appeal, you will receive the Appeal for the Fair Hearing form (either in person or by mail). After signing and submitting this form to your local office, the department can begin to set up a hearing. 

You can also begin an appeal by requesting a fair hearing through a local service center or a state office. If you choose to go through one of these offices specifically, they will complete the necessary form for you.

During the hearing, you will be able to present evidence and have legal representation in order to attempt to overturn the original denial notice. If the hearing results in another denial, you can ask for two additional hearings.  

You can request a reconsideration hearing, where you state why you are requesting relief and the hearing officer or administrative law judge reviews the case again. You must request this within 15 days of the hearing decision. 

Then, you can request a judicial review, where you bring the decision to a superior court (chancery court) in Tennessee for the case to be reviewed and decided upon. You must request this within 60 days of the most recent hearing decision. 

Texas

You have the right to file an appeal about a denied application within 90 days of the notice. Submit your appeal in writing or orally. 

Once notified of an applicant’s dissatisfaction with a decision and a request for a fair hearing, the local office must send over the request in order for a hearing to be arranged. During the hearing, bring evidence and witness testimony to support your case. Obtain representation or you represent yourself. During the hearing, the office can request additional information, which can extend the appeals process. 

If you are denied benefits once again after a fair hearing, you have the opportunity to appeal that decision two more times. 

You can request an administrative review. In this review, an agency attorney reviews the hearing record of the fair hearing that just passed to decide if the right decision was made. The attorney then makes a decision. You must submit a request for an administrative review in writing within 30 days of the hearing decision. 

Then, you can request a judicial review. In this review, you take the decision to a superior court for review. You must request a judicial review within 30 days of the administrative review decision. 

U.S. Virgin Islands

There are multiple ways to file an appeal:

The request must be submitted up to 90 days after the date of the notice. Seek legal representation for your appeal or if you prefer, represent yourself in the case. You can present evidence and/or witnesses to support your claim. A judge will make the final decision regarding your case.

Utah

To appeal a denial of food stamps benefits, you must fill out a Hearing Rights and Request for Hearing Form: https://jobs.utah.gov/appeals/490.pdf. Send it to your local Workforce Services Employment Center.

You must submit this form within 90 days of your denial notice. You can seek legal representation for your appeal or represent yourself in the case. In the event that your appeal results in the same decision, request a second appeal at the judicial level with a superior court. 

Vermont

There are multiple ways to file an appeal. These are: 

A Health Connect employee will work with you to set up the appeal. You can choose to represent yourself or be represented by someone else during the appeals process. 

You can also request a fair hearing by contacting a member of the Human Services Board: https://governor.vermont.gov/boards_and_commissions/human_services

Virginia

You must request an administrative hearing within 90 days of a denial notice. You can submit a hearing request verbally or in writing. The local agency is required by law to provide access to a Notice of Appeal form so you can submit a request.

You can fax the completed form to the Division of Appeals and Fair Hearings at: 804-726-7656.

If you do not agree with the decision after the hearing, request a review during which you provide additional information for the court to consider. You have 10 days to request a review from the decision date. Otherwise, request a second appeal. This is considered a judicial review and takes place in superior court. 

During the hearing process, you can get legal counsel or represent yourself. You can present evidence and witnesses to support your appeal.

Washington

You must request an administrative hearing within 90 days of a denial notice. You can submit a hearing request verbally or in writing. It does not have to be with a certain form. The request must be submitted to the Department of Social and Health Services or the Office of Administrative Hearings at:
PO Box 42489
Olympia, WA 98504-2489

You can make a hearing request to any department employee. You must provide this information: 

  • The date of the request 
  • The date when you received the denial
  • The name of the person making the request
  • What the request is for
  • Why you are not satisfied with the decision 

During the hearing, an administrative law judge will preside and make a decision regarding the case. You can request a review of the decision by providing additional information, which the judge can consider. Otherwise, you have 21 days to file a second appeal. This is considered a judicial review and takes place in superior court. 

The Board of Appeals will provide information on how to request a judicial review with the decision notification they send.   

West Virginia

If you receive a denial letter, you must request an administrative hearing within 90 days of the notice. Fill out the following form: http://dhhr.wv.gov/bcf/Services/familyassistance/PolicyManual/Documents/Chapter%206/DFA_FH_1.pdf

This form allows you to request a pre-hearing conference, where you can ask questions and potentially decide against further action and/or a fair hearing.

You can have a hearing in person or by phone. Regardless of your choice, the Department of Health and Human Resources worker can help you arrange the hearing and transport, if necessary. 

When completed, send the form to your local DHHR office. 

During the hearing process, you can get legal counsel or represent yourself. You can present evidence and witnesses to support your appeal. 

Wisconsin

If you receive a denial letter, you must request an administrative hearing within 90 days of the notice. Submit your request to your local Department of Health Service office. They will set up a hearing for your case to be heard. 

During the hearing process, you can get legal counsel or represent yourself. You can present evidence and witnesses to support your appeal

If you received a fair hearing decision within the last year, you will not be given an administrative hearing to appeal the benefits decision.

Wyoming

If you receive a denial letter, you must request an administrative hearing within 90 days of the notice. The hearing and decision will both occur within 60 days of when you applied. 

When you apply for a hearing, you must make a request in writing (mail or email) with this information: 

  • The date of the request 
  • The name of the person making the request
  • What the request is for

You will receive the decision within 20 days (30 days if extra information was asked for during the process). 

If it is another denial, file for a reconsideration within 10 days. Then, the final decision will be logged and sent to you by mail. 

If you wish to file a second appeal, submit a request to the District Court within 30 days. Then, if you receive another denial, a third appeal can be made through the Supreme Court. Throughout this process, you can get legal counsel or you can represent yourself. You can present evidence and witnesses to support your appeal.

How to Renew Your SNAP Benefits

To continue receiving SNAP benefits, recipients must recertify before the end of their benefits period. This process is also called redetermination or renewal. 

If a recipient completes the recertification before the original certification period ends, benefit issuance must continue on schedule uninterruptedly for another year (or two years for elderly or disabled families). Otherwise, if a recipient does not recertify, his or her benefits will end when the certification period ends.

The recertification process varies by state. Some states require recipients to complete an interview in person, but most states only require a phone interview in order for a current beneficiary to be recertified for SNAP benefits. An application will also need to be submitted. 

About 45 days before the end of a beneficiary’s certification period, most states will issue a notice of expiration (NOE) or recertification. 

The NOE will include: 

  • The date your household’s certification period comes to an end.
  • The date by which you need to submit the recertification application to continue receiving benefits.
  • The consequences of not submitting your application on time.
  • The notice of your right to have your application received as long as it is signed and you include your name and address.
  • Alternate methods you can follow to submit your recertification application (mainly for households with no means to reach a certification office for a representative to submit the form).
  • Mailing information for the office the application must be sent to.
  • Information on your right to request a fair hearing if the recertification application is denied.
  • Notice explaining that households receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) can apply for recertification at a Social Security Administration office.
  • Notice that informs the household that if it does not attend the interview, benefits will be delayed or denied, and that the household is responsible for scheduling a new interview and for providing verification documents.

According to federal regulations, the NOE will be sent at least one day before the last certification period month begins, and the beneficiary will get up to 15 days to send their application. 

The form that you receive will typically include a good deal of pre-filled information, allowing you to simply rectify any changes that you have not yet reported to the SNAP office and submit the form for processing. 

You do not need to wait until your recertification to notify your SNAP office about changes to your household. Please refer to the section called “Reporting Household Changes” of the guide for more information.

Recertification Process by Location

Select your state, district or territory to learn more about the recertification process:

Alabama

A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person. You can file your recertification up to 30 days after the certification period is over. Otherwise, you will need to apply for SNAP all over again.

Alaska

To begin the recertification method in Alaska, you can either:

  • Wait for the notice of expiration to arrive by mail to the address you registered. The notice should arrive before the last month of certification starts. Make sure to send it back by mail or submit it in person before the date indicated in the NOE.
  • Print and submit this application form: http://dpaweb.hss.state.ak.us/e-forms/pdf/GEN-72.pdf

American Samoa

Information about the recertification process in American Samoa is not available online. Please contact the DPHHS office. Please refer to the section “Contact Information by Location” to find contact information.

Arizona

To begin the recertification process in Arizona, form DCO-268 will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person.

Arkansas

A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person.

California

To begin the recertification process in California yopu can either:

Bear in mind that in order to renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Colorado

The recertification process in Colorado is generally initiated automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person. Find the county directory for mailing information here: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdhs/contact-your-county

However, you can also renew your eligibility online: https://coloradopeak.secure.force.com/.

Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands

A notice of disposition will arrive by mail with the new application form to be filled out and submitted. Send it back by mail or submit it in person. You will be subjected to an interview and verification of eligibility before your certification period can be extended.

Connecticut

The recertification process in Connecticut will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person.

However, you can renew your eligibility online: http://www.connect.ct.gov/. To apply for recertification online, you need to wait until the certification date is less than 60 days away. At that point, the option will become available online.

Delaware

The recertification process in Delaware will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person.

You can also renew your eligibility online: https://assist.dhss.delaware.gov/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

District of Columbia

You will need to download an application form, fill it out, sign it and submit it in person or by mail to:
Case Record Management Unit
Economic Security Administration
Department of Human Services
P.O. Box 91560
Washington, DC, 20090

The application form is combined, which means you can recertify your application for Food Stamps and reapply for Cash Assistance and Medicaid at the same time.

Printable Recertification Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/
Spanishhttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/Combined_Application_December_2015-Spanish_0_3.pdf
Ahmarichttps://dhs.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/dhs/publication/attachments/Combined_Application_v42_Amharic_Interactive_2.pdf

You can upload documents that show changes in your status online: https://dcbenefits.dhs.dc.gov/

Florida

The recertification process in Florida will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. You can send it back by mail or submit it in person.

You can also renew your eligibility online: https://www.myflorida.com/accessflorida/. If you have an account in the state portal and you have activated notifications, you will also be able to get a notification by email.

Georgia

The recertification process in Georgia will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. Send it back by mail or submit it in person.

However, if you do not receive the form, you can download the renewal application form yourself: https://dfcs.georgia.gov/document/document/form-508-food-stampmedicaidtanf-renewal-form/download [PDF download]

You can also renew your eligibility online: https://gateway.ga.gov/access/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Guam

Information is not available. Please contact your local agency to request more information. To contact the DPHSS, please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Loc,ation” of this guide.

Hawaii

The recertification process in Hawaii will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. The department will also include a scheduled appointment for an interview. Send back the application by mail or submit it in person.

Households that receive financial assistance and complete the redetermination before the last certification month of SNAP will automatically be recertified and continue receiving benefits.

Idaho

The recertification process in Idaho will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. The department will also include a scheduled appointment for an interview. Send back the application by mail or submit it in person.

Printable Recertification Formscolspan
Englishhttps://publicdocuments.dhw.idaho.gov/WebLink/DocView.aspx?id=3255&dbid=0&repo=PUBLIC-DOCUMENTS
Spanishhttps://publicdocuments.dhw.idaho.gov/WebLink/DocView.aspx?id=3254&dbid=0&repo=PUBLIC-DOCUMENTS

Illinois

The recertification process in Illinois will initiate automatically. A form will arrive by mail with the NOE before the last month of certification starts. The department will also include a scheduled appointment for an interview. Send back the application by mail or submit it in person.

To renew your benefits online, simply access this link: https://abe.illinois.gov/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform. To learn how to renew your benefits online read this quick guide: http://www.dhs.state.il.us/OneNetLibrary/27894/documents/ABE/IES-ABEGuideforCustomers10_2017.pdf

Indiana

The recertification process in Indiana will initiate automatically. You will receive a NOE with the application to fill out and a phone number that you can call to request your interview. You must bring documents to verify your situation and continued eligibility.

Iowa

The recertification process in Iowa will initiate automatically. A pre-filled form will arrive by mail with an NOE before the last month of certification starts. The department will also include a scheduled appointment for an interview. Send back the application by mail.

Printable Recertification Formscolspan
Englishhttps://dhs.iowa.gov/sites/default/files/470-2881.pdf?051820202119
Spanishhttps://dhs.iowa.gov/sites/default/files/470-2881S.pdf?051820202122

Kansas

The recertification process in Kansas will initiate automatically. A pre-filled form will arrive by mail with an NOE before or on the day the last month of certification starts. The department will also include a scheduled appointment for an interview, if applicable.

Regular households will have their eligibility reviewed every 12 months, while elderly or disabled households will be reviewed every 24 months.

Printable Recertification Formscolspan
Englishhttp://content.dcf.ks.gov/EES/KEESM/Forms/ES-3100REVIEW05-19.pdf
Spanishhttp://content.dcf.ks.gov/EES/KEESM/Forms/ES-3100REVIEW05-19Spanish.pdf

Kentucky

The recertification process in Kentucky will initiate automatically. A “Notice of Renewal Interview” will be issued on the 15th of the month before the last month of the certification period. The notice will inform the household that they have to schedule an interview and provide any missing documents to prove their continued eligibility for SNAP.

You can also renew your application and upload verification online: http://www.benefind.ky.gov/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform. Learn more about the process here: https://benefind.ky.gov/Anonymous/OpenFile?option=ARB

Louisiana

The recertification process in Louisiana will initiate automatically. A NOE will be sent to your home with the details to start your recertification application in person or by mail.

You can also renew your application online: https://cafe-cp.dcfs.la.gov/selfservice/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

An interview is not required. It will only be requested if information needs additional verification.

Maine

The recertification process in Maine will initiate automatically. You will receive a NOE at home with instructions on how to send your paper application to your local office. Mailing information will also be included.

You can also complete your recertification online: https://www1.maine.gov/benefits/account/login.html. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Maryland

The recertification process in Maryland will initiate automatically. The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office. Mailing information will also be included.

An interview may or may not be necessary. It will depend on the information you submit and if there are any changes.

Massachusetts

The recertification process in Massachusetts will initiate automatically. The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

You can also start the recertification in two other ways:

  1. Apply via the DTA Connect mobile app: https://www.mass.gov/how-to/download-the-dta-connect-mobile-app
  2. The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

If you have questions about the process, you can resort to DTA Connect FAQs here: https://www.mass.gov/info-details/dta-connect-frequently-asked-questions#general-

Michigan

The redetermination process in Michigan will initiate automatically. The redetermination form (DHS-2063-B) will arrive at your home attached to a notice, which will include the date and time of your interview, the proof you need to provide, the due date and a return envelope for you to mail the form.

You can also apply for redetermination online: https://www.michigan.gov/mibridges. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Most interviews are conducted by telephone. If you or a caseworker prefer an in-person interview, you can request one.

Minnesota

The recertification process in Minnesota will initiate automatically. You will receive your NOE with the recertification form by mail before the end of the month prior to the last certification month. It will contain all the necessary information to complete the process.

You can also apply online here: https://applymn.dhs.mn.gov/online-app-web/spring/public/process-login?execution=e2s1. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Mississippi

The recertification process in Mississippi will initiate automatically. The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

Missouri

The recertification process in Missouri will initiate automatically. You will receive a NOE in the mail along with a new application form (FS-1) and the instructions to fill it out. You can also find the instructions here: https://dss.mo.gov/fsd/formsmanual/instructions/fs-1.htm

Interviews are always necessary, unless you meet the elderly and disabled waiver interview criteria.

Montana

The recertification process in Montana will initiate automatically.

You will receive a NOE along with a Redetermination/ Recertification Report form before the last certification month starts. 

If you prefer, you can renew your benefits online: https://app.mt.gov/epass/Authn/selectIDP.html

The interview must be completed before the 10th of the last certification month to ensure your benefits will continue uninterruptedly.

Nebraska

You will receive a NOE by mail with the instructions to renew your benefits. You will need to have an interview and verification before being approved or denied recertification.

You can also redetermine your eligibility online: http://dhhs.ne.gov/pages/accessnebraska.aspx

Nevada

The recertification process in Nevada will initiate automatically. The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

You can also complete your redetermination application online: https://accessnevada.dwss.nv.gov/public/landing-page

New Hampshire

You will receive a NOE at home with instructions on how to complete the recertification process and submit your application. You can also check the instructions here: https://nheasy.nh.gov/forms/E/800R.pdf.

You can also apply for continued benefits online here: https://nheasy.nh.gov/#/.

New Jersey

The recertification process in New Jersey will initiate automatically. You will receive a notice by mail with instructions on how to renew your SNAP application, a recertification form, an interview appointment letter and, if necessary, a Notice of Required Verification (Form NJ SNAP-33).

New Mexico

The recertification process in New Mexico will initiate automatically. The form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

Renew your benefits online: https://www. yes.state.nm.us/yesnm/home/index. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

New York

Each household will receive by mail an NOE and instructions such as this example: https://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826A.pdf. If you have any questions, check the instructions on how to submit a recertification application here: https://otda.ny.gov/programs/applications/4826.pdf. You can submit your application by mail, by fax or in person (information included in the NOE).

Complete your recertification application online: http://www.mybenefits.ny.gov. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

North Carolina

Each household will receive a NOE, the pre-filled recertification form and instructions to submit a recertification application in the mail. In some cases, benefits can be renewed online. Once you receive the NOE by mail, call your caseworker or DHHS office and learn if you are eligible.

North Dakota

You will receive the “Notice X004 – Review Due – Interview,” a pre-filled review application form, the NOE and instructions on where to send the form by mail.

You can also complete your review application online: https://apps.sd.gov/ss36snap/web/Portal/Default.aspx. To renew your eligibility online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

After submitting the application you will need to complete an interview and, if needed, provide verification.

Ohio

The recertification form will arrive at your home attached to a NOE with instructions on how to send your application to your local office.

If you prefer, you can renew your benefits online: https://ssp.benefits.ohio.gov/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account in the state platform.

Oklahoma

The recertification process in Oklahoma will be inititated automatically. Renew your benefits by phone, mail or fax. To do so, simply follow the instructions in the NOE you will get by mail.

You can also renew your benefits online at: https://www.okdhslive.org/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Oregon

You will receive a recertification or packet by mail with instructions and a form to fill out and send back. Recertification packets are not sent outside the state.

Pennsylvania

You will receive a NOE by mail with the renewal form, an interview appointment notice and a verification checklist. You will need to mail your application.

You can find a copy of the form here: http://services.dpw.state.pa.us/oimpolicymanuals/snap/PA_10_SFSPO.pdf.

You can also find a copy of the verification checklist here: http://services.dpw.state.pa.us/oimpolicymanuals/snap/PA_253.pdf.

Complete your benefits renewal application online: https://www.compass.state.pa.us/compass.web/Public/CMPHome. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Puerto Rico

You will receive a NOE and will need to submit a renewal form by mail or in person.

Rhode Island

You will receive a NOE by mail with instructions and a form to fill out and send back. Elderly and disabled families will get a mid-certification reminder letter, reminding them to report changes.

You can also renew your benefits online: https://healthyrhode.ri.gov/HIXWebI3/DisplayHomePage

South Carolina

You will receive a NOE with a renewal form , interview notification and details on needed verification information. You can find a copy of the form here: https://dss.sc.gov/resource-library/forms_brochures/files/3807-a.pdf. Mail the information to the office address included in the form, send it by fax to 803-734-2012 or by email to SNAPTANFInbox@dss.sc.gov.

South Dakota

Households will receive a notice of renewal by mail along with instructions on how to send the form back and the next steps of the process. Send the form back by mail, by email, by fax or in person.

You can also renew your benefits online: https://apps.sd.gov/ss36snap/web/Portal/Default.aspx. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Tennessee

You will receive a NOE by mail with instructions, a renewal form to fill out and send back and an interview appointment notice.

Texas

Households will receive a NOE, recertification form and interview appointment notice by mail. They can either submit the form by mail, by fax or in person.

If you prefer, you can renew your benefits online: https://www.yourtexasbenefits.com. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

U.S. Virgin Islands

Information about the recertification process in the U.S. Virgin Islands is not available. Please contact your local SNAP office to request more information. For contact information, please refer to the section called “Contact Information by Location” of the guide.

Utah

You will receive a review NOE as well as a review form to fill out and send back. An interview and verification will be required as well.

You can renew your benefits online: https://jobs.utah.gov/mycase. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Vermont

You will receive by mail a reminder letter and recertification form (ESD 202) to reapply. You need to complete an interview and provide verification.

You can also recertify online: https://mybenefits.ahs.state.vt.us/Login.aspx. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Virginia

You will receive a notice as well as a renewal application form to fill out and send back.

If you prever, you can renew your benefits online: https://commonhelp.virginia.gov/access/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Washington

You will receive a notice as well as a renewal application form to fill out and send back.

You can also renew your benefits online: https://www.washingtonconnection.org/eapplication/home.go?action=ERIntroduction&source=. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

If you have any questions you can check the online renewal tutorial here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mcnmWMno4s&feature=youtu.be.

West Virginia

You will receive an instruction letter as well as a renewal application form to fill out and send back by mail to the office indicated in the instructions.

Complete your redetermination application online: https://www.wvpath.org/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Wisconsin

A notice will be sent by mail to your home with instructions on how to renew your benefits.

Renew your benefits online: https://access.wisconsin.gov/access/. To renew your benefits online you will need to have an account on the state website.

Wyoming

Households will receive a NOE (F801) as well as a SNAP recertification reminder notice (X101) with the instructions to renew the benefits. Submit the recertification application form by mail, as detailed in the instructions you will receive.

SNAP Fraud Consequences and How to Report Fraud

To continue receiving benefits from SNAP, you must follow the program’s guidelines and avoid fraud.

What is considered SNAP fraud?

The main instances of SNAP fraud are:

  • When someone exchanges SNAP benefits for cash. This is considered trafficking and is illegal. 
  • When individuals provide false information on their SNAP application in order to receive benefits or to receive a larger allotment.
  • When a retailer that has been disqualified to participate in the program lies on their application to become an approved EBT retailer again. 
  • When a retailer accepts food stamps as payment for unauthorized items like tobacco, paper products or alcohol.

What happens if I receive a higher benefit amount than what I am entitled to and I do not report it?

SNAP recipients who do not report changes or overpayments can be penalized and even lose the assistance altogether. 

Does the government take action against those who commit SNAP fraud?

The USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) has hundreds of investigators and analysts dedicated to determining household and retailer compliance. The FNS conducts undercover investigations on retailers and individuals suspected of fraud and works with state law enforcement officials to reduce trafficking operations. 

The Office of Inspector General (OIG), USDA, is in charge of investigating criminal violations of the Food Stamp Act.

How can I report SNAP fraud?

If you suspect SNAP fraud, report it right away. 

Fraud reports of any kind can be filed online with the USDA Office of Inspector General here: https://www.usda.gov/oig/

You can also report SNAP fraud via phone by calling the hotlines below:

  • 800-424-9121
  • 202-690-1622
  • 202-690-1202 (TDD)

If you would rather mail a detailed concern, send your letter to:
United States Department of Agriculture Office of Inspector General
P.O. Box 23399
Washington, DC 20026-3399

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